NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
Policy Manual

Policy Identification
Priority:
  Twenty-first Century Professionals
Category:  Qualifications and Evaluations
Policy ID Number:  TCP-C-006

Policy Title:  Policy on Standards and Criteria for Evaluation of Professional School Employees

Current Policy Date:  10/03/2013

Other Historical Information:  Previous Board date: 05/08/1998, 01/13/1999, 11/02/2006, 12/07/2006, 06/07/2007, 09/06/2007,12/04/2008/06/30/2010, 06/02/2011, 08/04/2011,03/01/2012, 04/05/2012, 10/04/2012, 04/04/2013

Statutory Reference:  

Administrative Procedures Act (APA) Reference Number and Category:  


THIS POLICY HAS BEEN ADOPTED BY THE NC STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION, BUT IS STILL PENDING CODIFICATION BY THE NC ADMINISTRATIVE CODE.  ALL CODIFIED RULES MAY BE ACCESSED BY GOING TO THE OAH WEBSITE.

 

 

Standards for Teacher Evaluation

 

NORTH CAROLINA PROFESSIONAL TEACHING STANDARDS

 

STANDARD 1: TEACHERS DEMONSTRATE LEADERSHIP

 

Teachers lead in their classrooms.

 

Teachers demonstrate leadership by taking responsibility for the progress of all students to ensure that they graduate from high school, are globally competitive for work and postsecondary education, and are prepared for life in the 21st Century. Teachers communicate this vision to their students.  Using a variety of data sources, they organize, plan, and set goals that meet the needs of the individual student and the class. Teachers use various types of assessment data during the school year to evaluate student progress and to make adjustments to the teaching and learning process.    They establish a safe, orderly environment, and create a culture that empowers students to collaborate and become lifelong learners.

 

·       Take responsibility for all students

·       Communicate vision to students

·       Use data to organize, plan, and set goals

·       Use a variety of assessment data throughout the year to evaluate progress

·       Establish a safe and orderly environment

·       Empower students

 

Teachers demonstrate leadership in the school.

 

Teachers work collaboratively with school personnel to create a professional learning community. They analyze and use local, state, and national data to develop goals and strategies in the school improvement plan that enhances student learning and teacher working conditions. Teachers provide input in determining the school budget and in the selection of professional development that meets the needs of students and their own professional growth.  They participate in the hiring process and collaborate with their colleagues to mentor and support teachers to improve the effectiveness of their departments or grade levels.

 

·       Work collaboratively with all staff to create a professional learning community

·       Analyze data

·       Develop goals and strategies through the school improvement plan

·       Assist in determining school budget and professional development

·       Participate in hiring process

·       Collaborate with colleagues to mentor and support teachers to improve effectiveness

 

Teachers lead the teaching profession.

 

Teachers strive to improve the teaching profession.  They contribute to the establishment of positive working conditions in their school, district, and across the state.   They actively participate in and advocate for decision-making structures in education and government that take advantage of the expertise of teachers.  Teachers promote professional growth for all educators and collaborate with their colleagues to improve the profession.

 

·       Strive to improve the profession

·       Contribute to the establishment of good working conditions

·       Participate in decision-making structures

·       Promote professional growth

 

Teachers advocate for schools and students.

 

Teachers advocate for positive change in policies and practices affecting student learning. They participate in the implementation of initiatives to improve the education of students. 

 

·       Advocate for positive change in policies and practices affecting student learning

·       Participate in the implementation of initiatives to improve education

 

Teachers demonstrate high ethical standards.

 

Teachers demonstrate ethical principles including honesty, integrity, fair treatment, and respect for others.  Teachers uphold the Code of Ethics for North Carolina Educators (effective June 1, 1997) and the Standards for Professional Conduct adopted April 1, 1998.

 

·       Demonstrate ethical principles

·       Uphold the Code of Ethics and Standards for the Professional Conduct

 

STANDARD 2: TEACHERS ESTABLISH A RESPECTFUL ENVIRONMENT FOR A DIVERSE POPULATION OF STUDENTS.

 

Teachers provide an environment in which each child has a positive, nurturing relationship with caring adults.

 

Teachers encourage an environment that is inviting, respectful, supportive, inclusive, and flexible.

 

·       Encourage an environment that is inviting, respectful, supportive, inclusive, and flexible

 

Teachers embrace diversity in the school community and in the world.

 

Teachers demonstrate their knowledge of the history of diverse cultures and their role in shaping global issues. They actively select materials and develop lessons that counteract stereotypes and incorporate histories and contributions of all cultures.  

 

Teachers recognize the influence of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and other aspects of culture on a child’s development and personality.

 

Teachers strive to understand how a student’s culture and background may influence his or her school performance.  Teachers consider and incorporate different points of view in their instruction. 

 

·       Demonstrate knowledge of diverse cultures

·       Select materials and develop lessons that counteract stereotypes and incorporate contributions.

·       Recognize the influences on a child’s development, personality, and performance

·       Consider and incorporate different points of view

 

Teachers treat students as individuals.

 

Teachers maintain high expectations, including graduation from high school, for children of all backgrounds. Teachers appreciate the differences and value the contributions of each student in the learning environment by building positive, appropriate relationships.

 

·       Maintain high expectations for all students

·       Appreciate differences and value contributions by building positive, appropriate relationships

 

Teachers adapt their teaching for the benefit of students with special needs.

 

Teachers collaborate with the range of support specialists to help meet the special needs of all students. Through inclusion and other models of effective practice, teachers engage students to ensure that their needs are met. 

 

·       Collaborate with specialists

·       Engage students and ensure they meet the needs of their students through inclusion and other models of effective practice

 

Teachers work collaboratively with the families and significant adults in the lives of their students.

 

Teachers recognize that educating children is a shared responsibility involving the school, parents/guardians, and the community. Teachers improve communication and collaboration between the school and the home and community in order to promote trust and understanding and build partnerships with all segments of the school community.  Teachers seek solutions to overcome cultural and economic obstacles that may stand in the way of effective family and community involvement in the education of their children.

·       Improve communication and collaboration between the school and the home and community.

·       Promote trust and understanding and build partnership with school community.

·       Seek solutions to overcome obstacles that prevent parental/community involvement. 

 

STANDARD 3: TEACHERS KNOW THE CONTENT THEY TEACH.

 

Teachers align their instruction with the North Carolina Standard Course of Study.

 

In order to enhance the NC Standard Course of Study, teachers investigate the content standards developed by professional organizations in their specialty area.   They develop and apply strategies to make the curriculum rigorous and relevant for all students and provide a balanced curriculum which enhances literacy skills.

 

Elementary teachers have explicit and thorough preparation in literacy instruction.  Middle and high school teachers incorporate literacy instruction within the content area/discipline.  

·       Teach the NC Standard Course of Study

·       Develop and apply strategies to make the curriculum rigorous and relevant

·       Develop literacy skills appropriate to specialty area

 

Teachers know the content appropriate to their teaching specialty.

 

Teachers bring a richness and depth of understanding to their classrooms by knowing their subjects beyond the content they are expected to teach and by directing students’ natural curiosity into an interest in learning.  Elementary teachers have a broad knowledge across disciplines.  Middle school and high school teachers have depth in one or more specific content areas/disciplines.

 

·       Know subject beyond the content they teach

·       Direct students’ curiosity in subject

 

Teachers recognize the interconnectedness of content areas/disciplines.

 

Teachers know the links and vertical alignment of the grade or subject they teach and the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. Teachers understand how the content they teach relates to other disciplines in order to deepen understanding and connect learning for students. Teachers promote global awareness and its relevance to the subjects they teach. 

 

·       Know links between grade/subject and the Standard Course of Study

·       Relate content to other disciplines

·       Promote global awareness and its relevance

 

Teachers make instruction relevant to students.

 

Teachers incorporate 21st Century life skills into their teaching deliberately, strategically, and broadly.    These skills include leadership, ethics, accountability, adaptability, personal productivity, personal responsibility, people skills, self direction, and social responsibility.  Teachers help their students understand the relationship between the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and 21st Century content which includes global awareness, financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy, civic literacy, and health awareness. 

 

·       Incorporate life skills which include leadership, ethics, accountability, adaptability, personal productivity, personal responsibility, people skills, self direction, and social responsibility.

·       Demonstrate the interconnectedness between the core content and 21st Century content that includes global awareness, financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy, civic literacy, and health and wellness awareness.

 

STANDARD 4: TEACHERS FACILITATE LEARNING FOR THEIR STUDENTS

 

Teachers know the ways in which learning takes place, and they know the appropriate levels of intellectual, physical, social, and emotional development of their students.

 

Teachers know how students think and learn.  Teachers understand the influences that affect individual student learning (development, culture, language proficiency, etc.) and differentiate their instruction.  Teachers keep abreast of evolving research about student learning. They adapt resources to address the strengths and weaknesses of their students.

 

·       Know how students think and learn

·       Keep abreast of evolving research and understand the influences on student learning

·       Adapt resources to address the strengths and weaknesses of students

 

Teachers plan instruction appropriate for their students.

 

Teachers collaborate with their colleagues and use a variety of data sources for short and long range planning based on the North Carolina Standard Course of Study.  These plans reflect an understanding of how students learn.  They engage students in the learning process.   Teachers understand that instructional plans must be constantly monitored and modified to enhance learning. Teachers make the curriculum responsive to cultural diversity and to individual learning needs. 

 

·       Collaborate with other teachers

·       Use data for short and long range planning

·       Engage students in the learning process

·       Monitor and modify plans to enhance student learning

·       Respond to cultural diversity and learning needs of students

 

Teachers use a variety of instructional methods.

 

Teachers choose the methods and techniques that are most effective in meeting the needs of their students as they strive to eliminate achievement gaps. Teachers employ a wide range of techniques including information and communication technology, learning styles, and differentiated instruction.

 

·       Choose methods and materials as they strive to eliminate achievement gaps

·       Employ a wide range of techniques using information and communication technology,  learning styles, and differentiated instruction

 

Teachers integrate and utilize technology in their instruction.

 

Teachers know when and how to use technology to maximize student learning.  Teachers help students use technology to learn content, think critically, solve problems, discern reliability, use information, communicate, innovate, and collaborate.

 

·       Know appropriate use

·       Assist students in use of technology to learn content, think critically, solve problems, discern reliability, use information, communicate, innovate, and collaborate

 

Teachers help students develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.

 

Teachers encourage students to use inquiry-based investigations, think creatively, develop and test innovative ideas, synthesize knowledge and draw conclusions.  They help students exercise and communicate sound reasoning, understand connections, make complex choices, and frame, analyze and solve problems. 

 

·       Encourage students to ask questions, think creatively, innovate and test ideas, synthesize knowledge and draw conclusions

·       Help students exercise and communicate sound reasoning, understand connections, make complex choices, and frame, analyze and solve problems

 

Teachers help students work in teams and develop leadership qualities.

 

Teachers teach the importance of cooperation and collaboration. They organize learning teams in order to help students define roles, strengthen social ties, improve communication and collaborative skills, interact with people from different cultures and backgrounds, and develop leadership qualities. 

 

·       Teach the importance of cooperation and collaboration

·       Organize learning teams in classroom in order to help students define roles, strengthen social ties, improve communication and collaborative skills, interact with people from different cultures and backgrounds, and develop leadership qualities

 

Teachers communicate effectively.

 

Teachers communicate in ways that are clearly understood by their students. They are perceptive listeners and are able to communicate with students in a variety of ways even when language is a barrier. Teachers help students articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively. 

 

·       Communicate clearly with students in a variety of ways

·       Assist students in articulating thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively

 

Teachers use a variety of methods to assess what each student has learned.

 

Teachers use multiple indicators, including formative and summative assessments, to evaluate student progress and growth as they strive to eliminate achievement gaps.  Teachers provide opportunities, methods, feedback, and tools for students to assess themselves and each other. Teachers use 21st Century assessment systems to inform instruction and demonstrate evidence of 21st Century knowledge, skills, performance, and dispositions.

 

·       Use multiple indicators, both formative and summative, to evaluate students progress

·       Provide opportunities for self-assessment

·       Use 21st Century knowledge, skills, performance and dispositions

 

STANDARD 5: TEACHERS REFLECT ON THEIR PRACTICE.

 

Teachers analyze student learning.

 

Teachers think systematically and critically about student learning in their classrooms and schools: why learning happens and what can be done to improve achievement. Teachers collect and analyze student performance data to improve school and classroom effectiveness. They adapt their practice based on research and data to best meet the needs of students. 

 

·     Think systematically about learning in their classroom: why learning happens and what can be done to improve student achievement

·     Collect and analyze student performance data to improve effectiveness

 

Teachers link professional growth to their professional goals.

 

Teachers participate in continued, high quality professional development that reflects a global view of educational practices; includes 21st Century skills and knowledge; aligns with the State Board of Education priorities; and meets the needs of students and their own professional growth.

 

·       Participate in continued, high quality professional development

 

Teachers function effectively in a complex, dynamic environment.

 

Understanding that change is constant, teachers actively investigate and consider new ideas that improve teaching and learning.  They adapt their practice based on research and data to best meet the needs of their students. 

 

·       Actively investigate and consider new ideas that improve teaching and learning

·       Adapt practice based on data

 

STANDARD 6: Teachers contribute to the academic success of      students. 

The work of the teacher results in acceptable, measurable progress for students based on established performance expectations using appropriate data to demonstrate growth.

 

Determining Standard 6 with Statewide Method

A teacher’s rating on the sixth standard is determined by a student growth value as calculated by the statewide growth model for educator effectiveness.  The measures of student learning - End-of-Course assessments, End-of-Grade assessments, Career and Technical Education Post-Assessments, NC Final Exams, K-3 Checkpoints, and Analysis of Student Work provide the student data used to calculate the growth value or performance rating.

Determining Standard 6 with Local Option Plan

Districts may use other assessments to measure student learning and determine the sixth standard rating if the State Board of Education approves those assessments.  Districts may also use school-wide growth values to determine the sixth standard rating.  The End-of-Grade assessments and End-of-Course assessments must be used for determining student growth values for teachers who administer those assessments.

To determine Standard 6 with local methods, a district must submit either:

·       A statement that school-wide growth values will be used to determine the Standard 6 ratings for educators in specific grades/subjects and courses.

·       A proposal for the use of other assessments to determine the Standard 6 ratings for educators in specific grades/subjects and courses.

Either submission must be signed by the superintendent, chair of the local board of education, and a teacher representing the district’s faculty.

The student growth value places a teacher into one of three rating categories:

Does not meet expected growth: the student growth value for the teacher is lower than what was expected per the statewide growth model.

Meets expected growth: the student growth value for the teacher is what was expected per the statewide growth model.

Exceeds expected growth: the student growth value for the teacher exceeds what was expected per the statewide growth model.

For the 2011 – 2012 school year, the student growth value is a weighted measure of the following:

70% based on the student growth value for the individual students taught by the educator

30% based on the student growth value for the entire school

 

For the 2012-13 school year, a teacher’s student growth value is based only on the student growth values for the individual students taught by that teacher (i.e., this comprises 100% of the sixth standard rating for the teacher). 

 

For the 2012-13 school year, if an educator does not have a growth value for his or her individual students, the growth value will be based on the data for the entire school. 

 

Note: Teachers whose student growth value is based on data for the entire school will not have that data count toward a three-year rolling average for determination of effectiveness status (see Effectiveness of Teachers section below).

 

All local school boards shall use student growth values generated through a method approved by the State Board of Education.

EFFECTIVENESS OF TEACHERS

 

Per federal requirements, the State must adopt definitions of effective and highly effective teachers.  These definitions constitute the official status of a teacher.

A highly effective teacher is one who receives a rating of at least “accomplished” on each of the Teacher Evaluation Standards 1 – 5 and receives a rating of “exceeds expected growth” on Standard 6 of the Teacher Evaluation Instrument.  The measures of student learning - End-of-Course assessments, End-of-Grade assessments, Career and Technical Education Post-Assessments, NC Final Exams, K-3 Checkpoints, and Analysis of Student Work - provide the student data used to calculate the growth value/rating.

An effective teacher is one who receives a rating of at least “proficient” on each of the Teacher Evaluation Standards 1 – 5 and receives a rating of at least “meets expected growth” on Standard 6 of the Teacher Evaluation Instrument.

A teacher in need of improvement is one who fails to receive a rating of at least “proficient” on each of the Teacher Evaluation Standards 1 – 5 or receives a rating of “does not meet expected growth” on Standard 6 of the Teacher Evaluation Instrument.

A three-year rolling average of student growth values generates the sixth standard rating used to determine teacher effectiveness, with the exception of the first statuses awarded to teachers in the fall of 2015.  If a district is determining Standard 6 with statewide assessments, only student growth values based on the individual students taught by a teacher will be used to determine the three-year rolling average for that teacher. 

If a district is determining Standard 6 with statewide assessments, teachers with individual student growth values for the 2012-13, 2013-14, and 2014-15 school years will receive a status in the fall of 2015 based on their summative ratings on Standards 1 – 5 in 2014-15 and a Standard 6 rating based on the average of the highest two of three student growth values from those years. 

After the first statuses awarded in the fall of 2015, a three-year rolling average will be used to assign the Standard 6 rating used to determine a status.

If a district has elected to determine Standard 6 with a local option plan approved by the State Board of Education, the district will determine the measures and the data required for an effectiveness status.

Any State Board of Education-mandated steps for improvement based on a teacher’s status of “in need of improvement” are delayed until a status is assigned in the fall of 2016.

 


 

Standards for School Psychologist Evaluation

NORTH CAROLINA PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY STANDARDS

 

The North Carolina Professional School Psychology Standards are the basis for school psychologist preparation, evaluation, and professional development. Colleges and universities are changing their programs to align with these standards; a new school psychologist evaluation instrument has been created; and professional development is taking on a new look based on these Standards. Each of these will include the skills and knowledge needed for 21st Century teaching and learning.

 

Vision for School Psychologists

 

The demands of twenty-first century education dictate new roles for school psychologists. School psychologists provide a wide variety of services that help students succeed academically, socially, and emotionally. In collaboration with educators, parents/guardians, and other mental health professionals’ school psychologists strive not only to create safe, healthy, and supportive learning environments for all students but also strengthen connections between home and school. Utilizing leadership, advocacy, and collaboration, school psychologists promote overall academic success by providing services that enhance the student, school, home, and community partnerships and alleviate barriers to learning.

 

In order to deliver a comprehensive school psychology program, school psychologists will understand and demonstrate competency in the following areas:

 

·       Home/School/Community Collaboration

·       Prevention, Early Intervention, and Crisis Management

·       School Systems Organizational Change, Policy Development, and Climate

·       Consultation and Collaboration

·       Student Diversity in Development and Learning

·       Systems-Based Service Delivery

·       Enhancement of Student Cognitive and Academic Skills

·       Enhancement of Student Wellness, Social Skills, and Life Competencies

·       Promoting Safe and Effective Learning Environments

·       Group and Individual Counseling Techniques

·       Data-Based Decision Making, Accountability, and Problem-Solving

·       Research and Program Evaluation

·       Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice

·       Information Technology

 

Intended Purpose of the Standards

 

The North Carolina School Psychology Standards serve as a guide for school psychologists as they continue to improve their effectiveness. Therefore, it is imperative for the school psychologist to provide services as part of a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary team with complementary knowledge, skills, and experiences.

 

The school psychology standards will:

·       guide the development of the skills and knowledge germane to the school psychology profession in the twenty-first century,

·       provide the focus for schools and districts as they employ, support, monitor, and evaluate their school psychologists, and

·       assist higher education programs in aligning the content and requirements of school psychology education curricula with expectations for practice.

 

Organization of the Standards

 

Standard: The Standard identifies the broad category of the school psychologist’s knowledge and skills.

Summary: The Summary provides explicit descriptions of the Standard’s content.

Practices: The Practices define the various tasks undertaken to demonstrate the Standard. The list of practices is not meant to be exhaustive.

Artifacts: The Artifacts provide examples of what the school psychologist might include as evidence in meeting the Standards.

 

These Standards are intended for use by North Carolina schools and local education agencies that employ school psychologists by a group of psychologists, administrators, and other interested professionals who dedicated a significant amount of time and energy to the betterment of the profession (See Appendix A). In developing these standards, the following were considered: the State Board of Education’s Mission and Goals; State Board of Education Policies QP-C-003 and QP-C-006; State General Statutes 115C-333 and 115C-335; North Carolina Standards for the Preparation of School Psychologists; the National Association of School Psychologists’ Professional Conduct Manual; Standards for Training and Field Placements Programs in School Psychology; and School Psychology: A Blueprint for Training and Practice III. In addition, the School Psychologist Development Team relied heavily on the National Association of School Psychologists’ Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services, which is included in this document as Appendix B.

 

Included are the major functions of the school psychologist employed in educational environments in North Carolina. Each function is followed by related evidences. As each work situation is different, it is not likely that all of the evidences will be demonstrated by all school psychologists.

 

STANDARD 1: SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS DEMONSTRATE LEADERSHIP.

 

School psychologists demonstrate leadership by promoting and enhancing the overall academic mission by providing services that strengthen the student, school, home, and community partnerships and alleviate barriers to learning in the twenty-first century. School psychologists contribute significantly to the development of a healthy, safe, caring, and supportive learning environment by advancing awareness and understanding of the social, emotional, psychological, and academic needs of students. School psychologists understand the influences of school, family, community, and cultural differences on academic achievement. School psychologists are knowledgeable of relevant laws and policies and improve the school psychology profession by demonstrating high ethical standards and following the codes of ethics set out for the profession. School psychologists demonstrate leadership by participating in school and district-level activities and committees to address system-level issues.

 

a. School Psychologists demonstrate leadership in the schools.

 

School psychologists work collaboratively with all school personnel to create a safe, positive learning community and assist in facilitating problem solving. School psychologists provide leadership and collaborate with other school personnel to provide effective school psychological services. School psychologists analyze and use local, state, and national data to assist in the development of prevention and intervention programs. Such programs assist in the development of School Improvement Plan (SIP) goals and strategies that enhance student learning and contribute to safe schools. School psychologists assist student learning by working collaboratively with school personnel to design, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of core instruction and evidence-based interventions. They demonstrate expertise in collecting, managing, and interpreting various types of individual and group data. School psychologists assist in the planning of professional development opportunities for parents, teachers, administrators, and the community to improve student academic outcomes. School psychologists assist in promoting safe and effective learning environments. School psychologists collaborate with their colleagues to hire, mentor, and support other school psychologists, thereby improving the effectiveness of student support services in the schools.

 

·       Work collaboratively with all school personnel to create a safe, positive learning community

·       Assist in facilitating problem-solving

·       Provide leadership and collaborate with other school personnel to provide effective school psychological services

·       Analyze and use local, state, and national data to assist in the development of prevention and intervention programs

·       Assist in the development of School Improvement Plan (SIP) goals and strategies that enhance student learning and contribute to safe schools

·       Assist student learning by working collaboratively with school personnel to design, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of core instruction and evidence-based interventions

·       Demonstrate expertise in collecting, managing, and interpreting various types of individual and group data

·       Assist in the planning of professional development opportunities for parents, teachers, administrators, and the community to improve student academic outcomes

·       Assist in promoting safe and effective learning environments

·       Collaborate with colleagues to hire, mentor, and support other school psychologists

 

 

b. School Psychologists enhance the school psychology profession.

 

School psychologists strive to enhance the school psychology profession. School psychologists actively participate in and advocate for decision-making structures in education and government that utilizes the expertise of school psychologists. School psychologists communicate the goals of the school psychological services to stakeholders. School psychologists maintain current and appropriate resources for students, parents, school, home, and community. School psychologists promote professional growth and collaborate with their colleagues, professional associations, and school psychology training programs to improve the profession.

 

·       Enhance the school psychology profession

·       Participate in and advocate for decision-making structures in education and government that utilizes the expertise of school psychologists

·       Communicate the goals of the school psychological services to stakeholders

·       Maintain current and appropriate resources for students, parents, school, home, and community

·       Promote professional growth and collaborate with colleagues, professional associations,

·       and school psychology training programs to improve the profession

 

c. School Psychologists advocate for students, families, schools, and communities.

 

School psychologists advocate for positive change in policies and practices affecting student learning. School psychologists share individual, classroom, building, and system data with administrators to promote school improvement and student outcomes. School psychologists support the School Improvement Plan (SIP) and student academic success through developing and utilizing internal and external partnerships and resources. School psychologists use data to monitor, evaluate, and adjust evidence-based interventions for students with behavioral, academic, affective, or social needs. School psychologists collaborate with other educators in implementing initiatives to alleviate the educational and mental health needs of students to improve student learning and to create safe learning environments. School psychologists provide direct services to individuals and groups of students to improve student learning. School psychologists promote family involvement in the educational process.

 

·       Advocate for positive change in policies and practices affecting student learning

·       Share individual, classroom, building, and system data with administrators to promote school improvement and improved student outcomes

·       Support the School Improvement Plan (SIP) and student academic success through developing and utilizing internal and external partnerships and resources

·       Use data to monitor, evaluate, and adjust evidence-based interventions for students with behavioral, academic, affective, or social needs

·       Collaborate with other educators in implementing initiatives to alleviate the educational and mental health needs of students to improve student learning and to create safe learning environments

·       Provide direct services to individuals and groups of students to improve student learning

·       Promote family involvement in the educational process

 

d. School Psychologists demonstrate high ethical standards.

 

School psychologists practice in ways that meet all appropriate ethical, professional, and legal standards. School psychologists demonstrate ethical principles, including honesty, integrity, fair treatment, and respect for others. School psychologists maintain confidentiality with student records and information. They recognize the limits of their expertise when providing student support services and utilize other resources as necessary. School psychologists deliver services consistent with the ethical principles and professional standards set forth by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) http://nasponline.org/standards/ethics.aspx), and/or American Psychological Association (APA) (http://www.apa.org/ethics), the Code of Ethics for North Carolina Educators (effective June 1, 1997), and the Standards for Professional Conduct adopted April 1, 1998.

 

·       Meet all appropriate ethical, professional, and legal standards.

·       Demonstrate ethical principles, including honesty, integrity, fair treatment, and respect for others.

·       Maintain confidentiality with student records and information.

·       Recognize limits of expertise when providing student support services and utilize other resources as necessary.

·       Deliver services consistent with ethical principles and professional standards set forth by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), and/or American Psychological Association (APA), the Code of Ethics for North Carolina Educators, and the Standards for Professional Conduct.

 

STANDARD 2: SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS PROMOTE A RESPECTFUL ENVIRONMENT FOR DIVERSE POPULATIONS.

 

School psychologists promote a safe, positive, and respectful learning environment in which individual differences are valued. School psychologists demonstrate sensitivity and skills needed to work with families, students, and staff from diverse cultures and backgrounds. They incorporate information about student backgrounds when designing interventions, conducting assessments, and providing consultation. School psychologists use knowledge of language development, including knowledge of second language acquisition, when evaluating and working with students of diverse language backgrounds. School psychologists collect and analyze local, state, and national data to assist in designing, implementing, and evaluating programs that reduce school violence and improve school safety. School psychologists promote fairness and social justice in educational programs and services. They utilize a problem-solving framework when addressing the needs of diverse populations.

 

a. School Psychologists promote an environment in which each student has positive nurturing relationships with caring adults.

 

School psychologists encourage an environment that is inviting, respectful, supportive, inclusive, and flexible. School psychologists provide developmentally appropriate and prevention-oriented strategies to nurture students’ relationships with caring adults. School psychologists advocate for student and family involvement in the educational process at all levels. School psychologists consider relevant individual differences (e.g., developmental level, cultural background, and area of disability) when selecting assessment procedures and when recommending educational services or interventions. School psychologists demonstrate sensitivity to issues related to disproportionality of minority populations in special education. They use knowledge of school climate to assist school personnel in assessing, analyzing, designing, implementing, and evaluating interventions that lead to positive and respectful learning environments for all students.

 

·       Provide developmentally-appropriate and prevention-oriented strategies that nurture students’ relationships with caring adults

·       Advocate for student and family involvement in the educational process at all levels

·       Consider relevant individual differences when selecting assessment procedures and when recommending educational services or interventions

·       Demonstrate sensitivity to issues related to disproportionality of minority populations in special education

·       Use knowledge of school climate to assist school personnel in assessing, analyzing, designing, implementing, and evaluating interventions that lead to positive and respectful learning environments for all students

 

b. School Psychologists use a global perspective to embrace diversity in the school, home, and community.

 

School psychologists recognize issues of diversity that affect their interactions with other people and organizations. School psychologists demonstrate their knowledge of diverse cultures and their role in shaping global issues. School psychologists recognize the influence of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and other aspects of culture on a student’s development and personality. School psychologists strive to understand how a student’s culture and background may influence his or her school performance. School psychologists provide professional development opportunities on the topic of diversity for parents, teachers, administrators, and the community. School psychologists demonstrate sensitivity and skills needed to work with families, students, and staff from diverse cultures and background. School psychologists modify or adapt their practices in order to effectively meet diverse needs.

 

·       Recognize issues of diversity that affect their interactions with other people and organizations

·       Demonstrate their knowledge of diverse cultures and their role in shaping global issues

·       Recognize the influence of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and other aspects of culture on a student’s development and personality

·       Understand how a student’s culture and background may influence his or her school performance

·       Provide professional development opportunities on the topic of diversity for parents, teachers, administrators, and the community

·       Demonstrate sensitivity and skills needed to work with families, students, and staff from diverse cultures and background

·       Modify or adapt their practices in order to effectively meet diverse needs

 

c. School Psychologists support high expectations for all students.

 

School psychologists maintain high expectations, including graduation from high school, for students of all backgrounds. School psychologists appreciate differences and value the contributions of each student in the learning environment by building positive, appropriate relationships. School psychologists assist students, individually and in groups, in developing social, affective, and adaptive skills. School psychologists understand learning and instruction and use such knowledge to assist school personnel in developing evidence-based interventions that support and encourage high expectations for all students. They understand the importance of early reading and math literacy in supporting high expectations for all students and promoting high school graduation rates. School psychologists assist school personnel in the assessment, analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation of prevention and intervention programs to promote effective early reading and math literacy skills for all students.

 

·       Maintain high expectations for all students

·       Appreciate differences and value the contributions of each student in the learning environment by building positive, appropriate relationships

·       Assist students, individually and in groups, in developing social, affective, and adaptive skills

·       Understand learning and instruction and use such knowledge to assist school personnel in developing evidence-based interventions that support and encourage high expectations for all students

·       Understand the importance of early reading and math literacy in supporting high expectations for all students and promoting high school graduation rates

·       Assist school personnel in the assessment, analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation of prevention and intervention programs to promote effective early reading and math literacy skills for all students

 

d. School Psychologists provide services that benefit students with unique needs.

 

School psychologists collaborate with administrators, teachers, and a range of specialists to help meet the unique needs of all students. School psychologists are knowledgeable about and skillful in using a problem-solving process to identify various assessment measures regarding academic achievement, cognitive, behavioral, affective, social, and adaptive functioning. They use data from multiple sources to develop evidence-based interventions for students whose specific behavioral, affective, or social needs have an impact on their own learning. School psychologists use data to monitor, evaluate, and adjust interventions for students with behavioral, affective, or social needs. School psychologists understand the physical and mental health conditions of children and adolescents. They provide leadership and participate in collecting needs assessment data to identify service gaps in meeting the social, affective, and developmental needs of children. School psychologists provide counseling to individuals or groups of students as appropriate. School psychologists demonstrate sensitivity to issues related to disproportionality of minority populations in special education.

 

·       Collaborate with administrators, teachers, and a range of specialists to help meet the unique needs of all students

·       Are knowledgeable about and skillful in using a problem-solving process to identify various assessment measures regarding academic achievement, cognitive, behavioral, affective, social, and adaptive functioning

·       Use data from multiple sources to develop evidence-based interventions for students whose specific behavioral, affective, or social needs have an impact on their own learning

·       Use data to monitor, evaluate, and adjust interventions for students with behavioral, affective, or social needs

·       Understand the physical and mental health conditions of children and adolescents

·       Provide leadership and participate in collecting needs assessment data to identify service

·       gaps in meeting the social, affective, and developmental needs of children

·       Provide counseling to individuals or groups of students as appropriate

·       Demonstrate sensitivity to issues related to disproportionality of minority populations in special education

 

e. School Psychologists work collaboratively with students and families.

 

School psychologists recognize that educating students is a shared responsibility involving the students, schools, families, and communities. School psychologists improve communication and collaboration among the student, school, home, and community in order to promote trust and understanding and build partnerships among the student, school, home, and community. School psychologists use a problem-solving process to seek solutions to barriers that inhibit effective family and community involvement in the students’ education. School psychologists participate in planning and implementing prevention programs to address the social and affective needs of students, including school or system-level crisis response.

 

·       Recognize that educating students is a shared responsibility involving the students, schools, families, and communities

·       Improve communication and collaboration among the student, school, home, and community

·       Promote trust and understanding and build partnerships among the student, school, home, and community

·       Use a problem-solving process to seek solutions to barriers that inhibit effective family and community involvement in the students’ education

·       Participate in planning and implementing prevention programs to address the social and affective needs of students

 

STANDARD 3: SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS USE THEIR KNOWLEDGE OF THE SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT, CHILD DEVELOPMENT, AND CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT.

 

School psychologists align their services to support the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and best practices. School psychologists incorporate information about students’ ethnic, racial, language, cultural, or socio-economic backgrounds when providing consultations, conducting evaluations, and designing interventions. School psychologists demonstrate knowledge of learning, child development, language development, curricula, and instruction in the development of evidence-based academic interventions. School psychologists have knowledge of universal screening, early reading and math literacy. They participate in designing prevention and intervention methods to address problems that impact student learning. School psychologists assist teachers and administrators in collecting and analyzing data to effectively design and implement programs that influence learning and behavior. School psychologists participate in the implementation and evaluation of programs that promote safe schools and communities. School psychologists participate in the development of school improvement plans to improve the school climate, student learning, and instruction.

 

a. School Psychologists deliver comprehensive services unique to their specialty area.

 

School psychologists possess a rich and deep understanding of students, schools, families, and communities. School psychologists utilize skills such as assessment, consultation, counseling, and collaboration to create and provide developmentally-appropriate and targeted interventions to meet the identified needs of students, schools, families, and communities. School psychologists support and encourage student and family involvement. School psychologists provide and interpret information about relevant research findings to school personnel, parents, and the public. School psychologists assist in the development, implementation, and evaluation of school-wide or system-wide early screenings, programs, and interventions based on needs assessments and other relevant data.

 

·       Understand students, schools, families, and communities

·       Utilize assessment, consultation, counseling, and collaboration skills to create and provide developmentally-appropriate and targeted interventions to meet the identified needs of students, schools, families, and communities

·       Support and encourage student and family involvement

·       Provide and interpret information about relevant research findings to school personnel, parents, and the public

·       Assist in development, implementation, and evaluation of school-wide or system-wide early screenings, programs, and interventions based on needs assessments and other relevant data

 

b. School Psychologists recognize the relationship between the school environment, curriculum and instruction, and the impact on the student learner.

 

School psychologists understand the link between school psychological services and the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. School psychologists understand the implications of demographic and socio-economic factors that influence student achievement. School psychologists communicate and collaborate effectively with teachers, other staff members, and families as part of a problem-solving team within the school setting. School psychologists communicate and collaborate effectively with community professionals and agencies (e.g., local physicians and mental health care providers) regarding student and school-related issues and identify appropriate resources, facilitate access to services, and coordinate services as appropriate.  School psychologists understand the way the relationship between school and classroom environment and curriculum and instruction can affect student learning. They use a problem-solving process to design, implement, and evaluate evidence-based intervention to improve student learning. They assist school staff in collecting and analyzing progress monitoring data to evaluate instruction and interventions.

 

·       Understand the link between school psychological services and the North Carolina Standard Course of Study

·       Understand the implications of demographic and socioeconomic factors that influence student achievement

·       Communicate and collaborate effectively with teachers, other staff members, and families as part of a problem-solving team within the school setting

·       Communicate and collaborate effectively with community professionals and agencies regarding student and school-related issues and identify appropriate resources, facilitate access to services, and coordinate services as appropriate

·       Understand the way the relationship between the school and classroom environment and curriculum and instruction can affect student learning

·       Use a problem-solving process to design, implement, and evaluate evidence-based interventions to improve student learning

·       Assist school staff in collecting and analyzing progress monitoring data to evaluate instruction and interventions

 

c. School Psychologists facilitate student acquisition of twenty-first century skills.

 

School psychologists are knowledgeable about the social, affective, and adaptive domains of child development. School psychologists identify and apply sound principles of behavior change within the social, affective, and adaptive domains in order to help design and implement prevention and intervention programs. School psychologists incorporate twenty-first century life skills deliberately, strategically, and broadly into their services. These skills include leadership, ethics, accountability, adaptability, personal productivity, personal responsibility, interpersonal skills, self-direction, and social responsibility. School psychologists help students understand the relationship between the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and twenty-first century content, which includes global awareness, financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy, civic literacy, and health and wellness awareness. School psychologists facilitate student understanding of twenty-first century content relevant to academic, social, affective, and adaptive success. They collaborate with administrators to address school and/or system needs and priorities.

 

·       Are knowledgeable about the social, affective, and adaptive domains of child development

·       Identify and apply sound principles of behavior change within the social, affective, and adaptive domains in order to help design and implement prevention and intervention programs Incorporate twenty-first century life skills deliberately, strategically, and broadly into their services

·       Understand the relationship between the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and twenty-first century content, which includes: global awareness, financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy, civic literacy, and health and wellness awareness

·       Facilitate student understanding of twenty-first century content relevant to academic, social, affective, and adaptive success

·       Collaborate with administrators to address school and/or system needs and priorities

 

d. School Psychologists develop comprehensive school psychological services that are relevant to all students.

 

School psychologists use data to develop comprehensive psychological services that are relevant to all students. They consult and confer with teachers, staff, and families about strategies to facilitate the social, emotional, and affective adjustment of all students. School psychologists participate in the planning and implementation of prevention and intervention programs to address the social and affective needs of all students. They incorporate into their programs the life and leadership skills students need to be successful in the twenty-first century. School psychologists use findings from intervention research when designing educational or mental health intervention programs for students.

 

·       Use data to develop comprehensive psychological services that are relevant to all students

·       Consult and confer with teachers, staff, and families about strategies to facilitate the social, emotional, and affective adjustment of all students

·       Participate in the planning and implementation of prevention and intervention programs to address the social and affective needs of all students

·       Incorporate into their programs the life and leadership skills students need to be successful in the twenty-first century

·       Use findings from intervention research when designing educational or mental health intervention programs for students

 

STANDARD 4: SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS SUPPORT STUDENT LEARNING THROUGH THE USE OF A SYSTEMATIC PROBLEM-SOLVING APPROACH.

 

School psychologists understand how social, emotional, psychological, and environmental factors influence students’ academic performance and achievement. School psychologists use a problem-solving process to assist in early identification of student learning problems. They use an ecological perspective to assess students’ cognitive and academic performance using a variety of instruments and techniques. School psychologists assist school staff in the collection of universal screening data and progress monitoring data. This data is then used to adjust academic instruction and interventions.

 

a. School Psychologists use a variety of strength-based methods.

 

School psychologists help schools develop challenging, but achievable, cognitive and academic goals for all students. School psychologists collaborate and consult with education stakeholders to develop appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, strengths, needs, and interventions to achieve these goals through involvement in problem-solving teams or in school-wide screening efforts. When working with teachers, administers, and families school psychologists utilize a strength-based approach that influences learning and behavior. School psychologists also use a strength-based approach when selecting assessment instruments to identify learning and behavior problems.

 

·       Develop challenging, but achievable, cognitive and academic goals for all students

·       Collaborate and consult with education stakeholders to develop appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, strengths, needs, and interventions to achieve these goals through involvement in problem-solving teams or in school-wide screening efforts

·       Utilize a strength-based approach that influences learning and behavior Use a strength-based approach when selecting assessment instruments to identify learning and behavior problems

 

b. School Psychologists help students develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.

 

School psychologists address issues that interfere with students’ ability to problem solve and think critically. School psychologists are knowledgeable about and skillful in the use of various evaluative techniques (e.g., behavioral observations, functional behavioral assessments, student, parent, and staff interviews, and threat assessments) regarding behavioral, affective, social, and adaptive functioning. School psychologists assist students in developing skills necessary to communicate effectively, synthesize knowledge, think creatively, and make informed decisions through direct services to individuals or groups of students (e.g., counseling, crisis intervention, mentoring, and individual safety plans as appropriate). School psychologists use a broad array of assessment procedures within a problem-solving model consistent with prevailing professional standards.

 

·       Address issues that interfere with students’ ability to problem solve and think critically

·       Are knowledgeable about and skillful in the use of various evaluative techniques regarding behavioral, affective, social, and adaptive functioning

·       Assist students in developing skills necessary to communicate effectively, synthesize knowledge, think creatively, and make informed decisions through direct services to individuals or groups of students

·       Use a broad array of assessment procedures within a problem-solving model consistent with prevailing professional standards

 

c. School Psychologists support students as they develop leadership qualities.

 

School psychologists help students strengthen interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, improve communication skills, understand cultural differences, and develop leadership skills. School psychologists use a strength-based approach to help students identify their interests, talents, and abilities. School psychologists assist students in finding service learning projects and opportunities to develop leadership skills in their home, school, and community.

 

·       Help students strengthen interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, improve communication skills, understand cultural differences, and develop leadership skills

·       Use a strength-based approach to help students identify their interests, talents, and abilities

·       Assist students in finding service learning projects and opportunities to develop leadership skills in their home, school, and community

 

d. School Psychologists possess effective communication skills.

 

School psychologists employ perceptive listening skills and are able to communicate effectively with students, school staff, families, and communities even when language is a barrier. School psychologists demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills. School psychologists write effective and practical assessment reports of student evaluations that adequately address referral question(s) and provide useful recommendations for teachers.

 

·       Employ perceptive listening skills

·       Communicate effectively with students, families, school staff, and communities even when language is a barrier

·       Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills

·       Write effective and practical assessment reports of student evaluations that adequately address the referral question(s) and provide useful recommendations for teachers

 

STANDARD 5: SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS REFLECT ON THEIR PRACTICE.

 

School psychologists demonstrate accountability for managing and delivering comprehensive school psychology services that strengthen home, school, and community partnerships in support of student learning. School psychologists analyze formal and informal data to evaluate the effectiveness of service delivery. School psychologists adapt their practice based on current and relevant research findings and data to best meet the needs of students, families, schools, and communities. School psychologists utilize collaborative relationships with colleagues, families, and communities to reflect upon and improve their practice.

 

a. School Psychologists analyze the impact of the school psychological services on student learning.

 

School psychologists think systemically and critically about the impact of comprehensive school psychological services on student social, emotional, psychological, and academic success. School psychologists collect and analyze student data to plan and evaluate the effectiveness of service delivery. Based on current and relevant research findings and data, school psychologists’ adapt their practices to best meet the needs of students, schools, families, and communities, thus improving their practice.

 

·       Think systemically and critically about the impact of comprehensive school psychological services on student social, emotional, psychological and academic success

·       Collect and analyze student data to plan and evaluate the effectiveness of service delivery

·       Based on current and relevant research findings and data, school psychologists’ adapt their practices to best meet the needs of students, schools, families, and communities, thus improving their practice

 

b. School Psychologists link professional growth to their professional goals.

 

School psychologists continually participate in high quality professional development specific to school psychological practice. School psychologists also understand a global view of educational practices, including twenty-first century skills and knowledge aligned with the State Board of Education’s priorities and initiatives. School psychologists join and/or participate in local, state, and national professional organizations to expand areas of expertise and stay current with professional standards of practice.

 

·       Participate in high quality professional development specific to school psychological practice

·       Understand a global view of educational practices including twenty-first century skills and knowledge aligned with the State Board of Education’s priorities and initiatives

·       Join and/or participate in local, state, and national professional organizations to expand areas of expertise and stay current with professional standards of practice

 

c. School Psychologists function effectively in a complex, dynamic environment.

 

School psychologists understand that change is constant; therefore, they actively investigate and consider new ideas that support students’ social, emotional, psychological, and academic successes. School psychologists demonstrate familiarity with current research in psychology and education and incorporate this knowledge in instructional planning and consultation. School psychologists use findings from scientifically based intervention research when designing educational, mental health, or treatment programs for children. School psychologists adapt their practice based on current research findings and data to best meet the needs of all students.

 

·       Actively investigate and consider new ideas that support students’ social, emotional, psychological, and academic successes

·       Demonstrate familiarity with current research in psychology and education and incorporate this knowledge in instructional planning and consultation

·       Use findings from scientifically-based intervention research when designing educational, mental health, or treatment programs for children

·       Adapt practice based on current research findings and data to best meet the needs of all students

 

 


 

Standards for School Counselor Evaluation

NORTH CAROLINA PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL COUNSELING STANDARDS

 

The North Carolina Professional School Counseling Standards are the basis for school counselor preparation, evaluation, and professional development. Colleges and universities are changing their programs to align with these standards; a new school counselor evaluation instrument has been created; and professional development is taking on a new look based on these Standards. Each of these will include the skills and knowledge needed for 21st century teaching and learning.

 

Vision for School Counseling

 

The demands of 21st century education dictate new roles for school counselors. Schools need professional school counselors who are adept at creating and utilizing systems for change and at building relationships within the school community. Professional school counselors create nurturing relationships with students that enhance students’ academic achievement and personal success as globally productive citizens in the 21st century. Utilizing leadership, advocacy, and collaboration, professional school counselors promote academic success and personal success by implementing a comprehensive school counseling program that encompasses areas of academic, career, and personal/social development for all students.

In order to deliver a comprehensive school counseling program, the professional school counselor should understand and be competent in the following areas:

 

·       Human growth and development,

·       Core components for helping relationships

·       Culture diversity

·       Societal change and trends,

·       Student learning and academic success,

·       Evaluation of student needs,

·       Group and individual counseling techniques,

·       Career development,

·       Use of data,

·       Use of technology,

·        Role of the school counselor in leadership, advocacy, and systemic change,

·       Legal and ethical guidelines,

·       Collaboration with internal and external stakeholders,

·       Research and program evaluation,

·       School culture and mission, and

·       Interaction with other educational professionals.

 

Intended Purpose of the Standards

 

The North Carolina Standards for School Counseling have been developed as a resource for school counselors to enhance their knowledge and skills. Therefore, it is incumbent upon the school counselor to provide services as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary team with complementary knowledge, skills, and experiences.

 

The school counselor standards will:

 

·       guide professional development as school counselors move forward in the 21st century;

·       provide the focus for schools and districts as they support, monitor, and evaluate their school counselor; and

·       assist higher education programs in developing the content and requirements of school counselor education curricula.

 

Organization of the Standards

 

Standard: The Standard is the broad category of the School Counselor’s knowledge and skills.

Summary: The summary provides explicit descriptions of the Standard’s content.

Practices: The practices define the various tasks undertaken to demonstrate the Standard. The list of practices is not meant to be exhaustive.

Artifacts: The artifacts are the examples of standard practices the School Counselor might include as evidence in meeting the Standards.

 

These Standards are intended for use by North Carolina schools and local education agencies that employ school counselors. In developing these Standards, the State Board of Education Mission and Goals; State Board of Education Policies QP-C-003 and QP-C-006; State General Statutes 115C-333 and 115C-335; current North Carolina School Counselor Job Description; The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs; the current State Comprehensive School Counseling Standard Course of Study; the North Carolina Standards for the Preparation of School Counselors; and the U.S. Department of Education’s The Guidance Counselor’s Role in Ensuring Equal Educational Opportunity were consulted.

 

STANDARD 1: SCHOOL COUNSELORS DEMONSTRATE LEADERSHIP, ADVOCACY, AND COLLABORATION.

 

Professional school counselors demonstrate leadership, advocacy, and collaboration by developing a positive place for students and staff members to learn and grow. School counselors manage a comprehensive school counseling program that supports academic, career, and personal/social development for all students. School counselors advocate for equity for all students and staff members regardless of their learning style, cultural background, or individual learning needs. School counselors improve the counseling profession by demonstrating high ethical standards and by following the code of ethics set out for them.

 

a. School Counselors demonstrate leadership in the school. 

 

School counselors work collaboratively with all school staff to create a positive learning community. School counselors take an active role in analyzing local, state, and national data to develop and enhance school counseling programs. School counselors create data-driven goals and strategies that align with the school improvement plan to improve student learning. School counselors annually discuss the comprehensive school counseling program with the school administrator. School counselors provide input in the selection of professional development for the school staff that meets the needs of students and choose professional development activities that foster their own professional growth. School counselors mentor and support colleagues to improve the academic success of students.

 

·       Work collaboratively with all school staff to create a positive learning community.

·       Take an active role in analyzing local, state, and national data to develop and enhance school counseling programs.

·       Create data driven goals and strategies that align with the school improvement plan.

·       Discuss the comprehensive school counseling program with the school administrator.

·       Provide input in the selection of professional development for the school staff.

·       Choose professional development activities that foster their own professional growth.

·       Mentor and support colleagues.

 

b. School Counselors enhance the counseling profession. 

 

School counselors strive to improve the counseling profession by staying current in research and best practices. School counselors contribute to establishing a positive school climate. School counselors promote professional growth for all educators and collaborate with their colleagues to improve the profession.

 

·       Strive to enhance the counseling profession.

·       Contribute to establishing a positive school climate.

·       Promote professional growth.

·       Collaborate with their colleagues.

 

c. School Counselors advocate for schools and students.

 

School counselors advocate for positive change in policies and practices affecting student learning. School counselors promote awareness of, and responsiveness to, learning styles, cultural diversity, and individual learning needs. School counselors collaborate with staff in building relationships with students that have a positive impact on student achievement. School counselors participate in the implementation of initiatives to improve the education and development of all students. School counselors advocate for equitable, student-centered legislation, policy, and procedures.

·       Advocate for positive change in policies and practices affecting student learning.

·       Promote awareness of, and responsiveness to, learning styles, cultural diversity, and individual learning needs.

·       Participate in the implementation of initiatives to improve the education and development of all students.

·       Advocate for equitable, student-centered legislation, policy, and procedures.

 

d. School Counselors demonstrate high ethical standards.

 

School counselors demonstrate ethical behaviors. School counselors uphold the American School Counselor Association’s Ethical Standards for School Counselors, revised June 26, 2004 (http://www.schoolcounselor.org/content.asp?contentid=173), the Code of Ethics for North Carolina Educators (effective June 1, 1997), and the Standards for Professional Conduct adopted April 1, 1998. (Please see Appendix A).

 

·       Demonstrate ethical behaviors.

·       Uphold the American School Counselor Association’s Ethical Standards for School Counselors.

·       Uphold the Code of Ethics and Standards for North Carolina Educators and Standards for Professional Conduct.

 

 

STANDARD 2: SCHOOL COUNSELORS PROMOTE A RESPECTFUL ENVIRONMENT FOR DIVERSE POPULATION OF STUDENTS.

 

Professional school counselors establish a respectful school environment to ensure that each student is supported by caring staff. School counselors recognize diversity and treat students as individuals, holding high expectations for every student. Knowing that students have many different needs, school counselors work to identify those needs and adapt their services to meet them. School counselors recognize the fact that many adults share responsibility for education students and collaborate with them to facilitate student academic success.

 

a. School Counselors foster a school environment in which each student has a positive, nurturing relationship with caring adults.

 

School counselors create an environment that is inviting, respectful, supportive, inclusive, and flexible. School counselors model and teach behaviors that lead to positive and nurturing relationships through developmentally appropriate and prevention-oriented activities.

 

·       Create an environment that is inviting, respectful, supportive, inclusive, and flexible.

·       Model and teach positive behaviors that lead to positive and nurturing relationships through developmentally appropriate and prevention-oriented activities.

 

b. School Counselors embrace diversity in the school community and in the world.

 

School counselors demonstrate knowledge of the history of diverse cultures and their role in shaping global issues. School counselors collaborate with teachers to ensure that the presentation of the North Carolina Standard Course of Study is relevant to a diverse student population. School counselors actively select materials and develop activities that counteract stereotypes and incorporate histories and contributions of diverse cultures. School counselors recognize the influence of culture on a child’s development and personality. School counselors help other understand how a student’s culture, language, and background may influence school performance and consider these influences in the programs and services they provide.

 

·       Demonstrate knowledge of the history of diverse cultures and their role in shaping global issues.

·       Collaborate with teachers to ensure that the presentation of the Standard Course of Study is relevant to a diverse student population.

·       Select materials and develop activities that counteract stereotypes and incorporate histories and contributions.

·       Understand how a students’ culture, language, and background may influence school performance and consider these influences in the programs and services they provide.

 

c. School Counselors treat students as individuals.

 

School counselors maintain high expectations, including graduation from high school, for students of all backgrounds. School counselors appreciate differences and value the contributions of each student in the learning environment.

 

·       Maintain high expectations for all students.

·       Appreciate differences and value the contributions of each student in the learning environment.

 

d. School Counselors recognize students are diverse and adapt their services accordingly.

 

School counselors recognize that all students have different needs and collaborate with school and community personnel to help meet their needs. School counselors identify these needs using data, referrals, observation, and other sources for information. School counselors collaborate with others to create a customized plan of action that provides follow-up services to meet students’ varied needs.

 

·       Collaborate with school and community personnel to help meet student needs.

·       Identify special needs using data, referrals, observations, and other sources of information.

·       Collaborate with others to create a customized plan of action that provides follow-up services to meets students’ varied needs.

 

e. School Counselors work collaboratively with families and significant adults in the lives of students.

 

School counselors recognize that educating students is a shared responsibility involving the school, parents/guardians, and the community. School counselors improve communication and collaboration among the school, home, and community in order to promote and build trust, understanding, and partnerships with all segments of the school community. School counselors seek solutions to overcome barriers that may stand in the way of effective family and community involvement in the education of students.

 

·       Improve communication and collaboration among the school, home, and community.

·       Promote and build trust, understanding, and partnerships with all segments of the school community.

·       Seek solutions to overcome barriers that may stand in the way of effective family and community involvement.

 

STANDARD 3: SCHOOL COUNSELORS UNDERSTAND AND FACILITATE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOL COUNSELING PROGRAM.

 

Professional school counselors align their programs with state and national best practices to ensure that their role fits in the school program. A comprehensive school counseling program meets the academic, career, and social/emotional development needs of students through the implementation of programming including individual counseling, classroom presentation, academic advising, career development services, consultation, parent education and other responsive services. School counselors deliver a comprehensive school counseling program for all students and provide developmentally appropriate services and activities based on student needs. A school counselor must engage in leadership, advocacy, and collaboration with all school personnel for the successful implementation of a comprehensive school counseling program. School counselors understand how students learn and help all students develop in the areas of academic, career and personal social success. School counselors align with the North Carolina Standard Course of Study to meet the needs of students.

 

a. School Counselors align their programs to support student success in the North Carolina Standard Course of Study.

 

In order to support the North Carolina Standard Course of Study, school counselors align content standards and implement program models developed by professional organizations in school counseling. School counselors support equity and access to rigorous and relevant curricular for all students. School counselors develop and apply strategies to enhance student success.

 

·       Align content standards and implement program models develops by professional organizations in school counseling.

·       Support equity and access to rigorous and relevant curricula.

·       Develop and apply strategies to enhance student success.

 

b. School Counselors understand how their professional knowledge and skills support and enhance student success.

 

School counselors bring richness and depth of understanding to their school through their knowledge of theories and research about human development, student learning, and academic success. School counselors apply this knowledge as they address the academic, career, and personal/social development of all students.

 

·       Know theory and research about human development, student learning, and academic success.

·       Address the academic, career, and personal/social development of all students.

 

c. School Counselors recognize the interconnectedness of the comprehensive school counseling program with academic content areas/disciplines.

 

School counselors understand how the comprehensive school counseling program relates to other disciplines. School counselors support the mission and goals of the school and district by providing technical assistance to all curricula areas as they align components of the North Carolina Standard Course of Study to their content areas/disciplines. School counselors support teachers and other specialists’ use of the North Carolina State Standards to develop and enhance students’ twenty-first century skills and global awareness.

 

·       Support the mission and goals of the school and district by providing technical assistance to all curricula areas as the align components of the North Carolina Standard Course of Study Guidance Curriculum to their content areas/disciplines.

·       Support teachers and other specialists’ use of the North Carolina Guidance Curriculum to develop and enhance students’ 21st century skills and promote global awareness.

 

d. School Counselors develop comprehensive school counseling programs that are relevant to students.

 

School counselors use data to develop comprehensive programs that meet student needs. School counselors deliberately, strategically, and broadly incorporate into their programs the life skills that students need to be successful in the twenty-first century. These skills span the academic, personal/social, and career domains and include leadership, ethics, accountability, adaptability, personal productivity, personal responsibility, people skills, self-direction, and social responsibility.

 

·       Use data to develop comprehensive programs that meet student needs.

·       Incorporate into their programs the life skills that students need to be successful in the 21st century.

 

STANDARD 4: SCHOOL COUNSELORS PROMOTE LEARNING FOR ALL STUDENTS.

 

Professional school counselors are knowledgeable of the ways learning takes place and understands the significance of academic, career, and personal/social development of all students. School counselors work to eliminate barriers that students may experience. School counselors use data to plan programs that help students develop their academic and career- related skills as well as their abilities to relate cooperatively and effectively with other people. School counselors use a variety of methods to implement programs that will help raise achievement and close gaps. School counselor help students think through their problems and fine solutions. School counselors listen and communicate well, and they model those behaviors for others around them.

 

a. School Counselors know how students learn.

School counselors understand the teaching and learning process. School counselors know the influences that affect individual student learning, such as human development, culture, and language proficiency. School counselors are aware of barriers that impact student learning and assist in overcoming them. School counselors provide resources to staff to enhance student strengths and address student weaknesses.  

 

·       Know the influences that affect individual student learning, such as human development, culture, and language proficiency.

·       Assist in overcoming those barriers that impact student learning.

·       Provide resources to staff to enhance student strengths and address student weaknesses.

 

 

b. School Counselors plan their programs for the academic, career, and personal/social development of all students.

 

School counselors use academic, behavior, and attendance data to plan appropriate programs for students. School counselors discuss the comprehensive school counseling program with school administrators and communicate the goals of the program to stakeholders. School counselors consult and collaborate with colleagues, parent/guardians, and other stakeholders to ensure that students’ needs are addressed. School counselors make their programs responsive to cultural diversity and student needs.

 

·       Use academic, behavior and attendance data to plan appropriate programs.

·       Discuss the comprehensive school counseling program with school administrators and communicate the goals of the program to stakeholders.

·       Consult and collaborate with colleagues, parents/guardians, and other stakeholders.

·       Make their programs responsive to cultural diversity and student needs.

 

c. School counselors use a variety of delivery methods.

 

School counselors utilize the Guidance Curriculum, Individual Student Planning, and Preventive and Responsive Services in meeting the needs of students as they strive to raise achievement and close gaps. School counselors spend the majority of their time in these direct services, allocating time based on the developmental needs of their students. School counselors are responsive to individual student needs and differences in learning styles and culture in the programs and activities they provide. School counselors employ technology as appropriate to enhance delivery of their programs.

 

·       Utilize the Guidance Curriculum, Individual Student Planning, and Preventive and Responsive Services in meeting the needs of students as they strive to raise achievement and close gaps.

·       Allocate time based on the developmental needs of their students.

·       Respond to individual student needs and differences in learning styles and culture in the programs and activities they provide.

·       Employ technology as appropriate to enhance delivery of their programs.

 

d. School Counselors help students develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

 

School counselors assist all students with developing academic, career, and personal/social skills. School counselors help students utilize sound reasoning, understand connections, and make complex choices. School counselors help students learn problem-solving techniques that incorporate critical thinking skills such as identifying problems, recognizing options, weighing evidence, and evaluating consequences. School counselors encourage students to use these skills to make healthy and responsible choices in their everyday lives.

 

·       Assist all students with developing academic, career, and personal/social skills.

·       Help students utilize sound reasoning, understand connections, and make complex choices.

·       Help students learn problem-solving techniques that incorporate critical thinking skills such as identifying problems, recognizing options, weighing evidence, and evaluating consequences.

·       Encourage students to use these skills to make healthy and responsible choices in their everyday lives.

 

e. School Counselors use and promote effective listening and communication skills.

 

School counselors listen responsively to students, colleagues, parents/guardians, and other stakeholders in order to identify issues and barriers that impede student success. School counselors use a variety of methods to communicate effectively in support of the academic, career, and personal/social development of all students. School counselors assist students in developing effective listening and communication skills in order to enhance academic success, build positive relationships, resolve conflicts, advocate for themselves, and become responsible twenty-first century citizens.

 

·       Listen responsively to students, colleagues, parents/guardians, and other stakeholders in order to identify issues and barriers that impede student success.

·       Use a variety of methods to communicate effectively in support of the academic, career, and personal/social development of all students.

·       Assist students in developing effective listening and communication skills in order to enhance academic success, build positive relationships, resolve conflicts, advocate for themselves, and become responsible 21st century citizens.

 

STANDARD 5: SCHOOL COUNSELORS ACTIVELY REFLECT ON THEIR PRACTICE.

 

Professional school counselors demonstrate accountability for managing and delivering a comprehensive school counseling program. School counselors analyze formal and informal data to evaluate their programs in a deliberate on-going manner. School counselors participate in professional development opportunities that support the school and district’s mission as well as the comprehensive counseling program. School counselors recognize that change is constant and use best practices to continually improve their programs.

 

a. School Counselors analyze the impact of the school counseling program.

 

School counselors think systematically and critically about the impact of the comprehensive school counseling program on student academic, career, and personal/social development. School counselors analyze student achievement, behavior, and school climate data, as well as feedback from students, parents, and other stakeholders to continually develop their program. School counselors evaluate the effectiveness of their program based on these data.

 

·       Think systematically and critically about the impact of the comprehensive school counseling program on student academic, career, and personal/ social development.

·       Analyze student achievement, behavior, and school climate data, as well as feedback from students, parents, and other stakeholders to continually develop their program.

·       Evaluate the effectiveness of their program.

 

b. School Counselors link professional growth to the needs of their school and their program goals.

 

School counselors participate in continued, high quality professional development that reflects a global view of educational practices; includes twenty-first century skills and knowledge; aligns with the State Board of Education priorities; and meets the needs of students and their own professional growth.

 

·       Participate in continued, high quality professional development.

 

c. School Counselors function effectively in a complex dynamic environment.

 

Understanding that change is constant, school counselors actively investigate and consider new ideas that improve student academic, career, and personal/social development as well as the school counseling profession. School counselors collaborate with students, staff, parents, and other stakeholders to implement these ideas.

 

·       Actively investigate and consider new ideas that improve student academic, career, and personal/social development as well as the school counseling profession.

·       Collaborate with students, staff, parents, and other stakeholder to implement these ideas.

 


 

Standards for School Social Worker Evaluation

NORTH CAROLINA PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK STANDARDS

 

The North Carolina Professional School Social Work Standards are the basis for School Social Worker preparation, evaluation, and professional development. Colleges and universities are changing their programs to align with these standards; a new School Social Worker evaluation instrument has been created; and professional development is taking on a new look based on these Standards. Each of these will include the skills and knowledge needed for 21st century teaching and learning.

 

Intended Purpose of the Standards

 

The North Carolina Standards for School Social Work have been developed as a guide for School Social Workers as they continually improve their effectiveness. It is incumbent upon the School Social Worker to provide services as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary team with complementary knowledge, skills, and experiences.

 

The School Social Worker standards will:

·       Guide professional development as School Social Workers move forward in the 21st century so that School Social Workers can attain the skills and knowledge needed;

 

·       Provide the focus for schools and districts as they support, monitor and evaluate their School Social Workers; and

 

·       Assist higher education programs in the development of content and requirements of School Social Work education curricula.

 

Organization of the Standards

 

Standard: The Standard is the broad category of the School Social Worker’s knowledge and skills.

Summary: The summary provides explicit descriptions of the Standard’s content.

Practices: The practices define the various tasks undertaken to demonstrate the Standard. The list of practices is not meant to be exhaustive.

Artifacts: The artifacts are documentation of standard practices the School Social Worker might include as evidence in meeting the Standards.

 

These Standards are intended for use by North Carolina public schools and local education agencies that employ School Social Workers. The State Board of Education Mission and Goals; State Board of Education Policies QP-C-003 and QP-C-006; State General Statutes 115C-333 and 115C-335; North Carolina Standards for the Preparation of School Social Workers approved by the State Board of Education on November 3, 2005; select pages from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction School Social Work Practice Guide; and the Illinois State Board of Education Standards for the School Social Worker were consulted.

 

STANDARD 1: SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKERS DEMONSTRATE LEADERSHIP.

 

School Social Workers demonstrate leadership by promoting and enhancing the overall academic mission by providing services that strengthen home, school, and community partnerships. School Social Workers use their professional training, depth of knowledge, and experience to work with individuals and teams to facilitate partnerships that support the school and district mission. The School Social Worker contributes significantly to development of a healthy, safe, and caring school environment by advancing the understanding of the social, emotional, psychological, and academic needs of students.  School Social Workers initiate the development of community, district, and school resources to address unmet needs that affect academic achievement and alleviate barriers to learning in the 21st century. School Social Workers are knowledgeable of relevant laws, policies, and procedures and provide staff development and training regarding these areas to educate and encourage compliance.

 

a. School Social Workers demonstrate leadership in school. 

 

School Social Workers collaboratively engage all school personnel to create a professional learning community. School Social Workers develop and maintain a written plan of data-driven goals and strategies for effective delivery of the school social work program based on national best practices, individual school data, current relevant research findings, and the School Improvement Plan. School Social Workers provide input in the selection of professional development to impart staff with the knowledge to meet the educational needs of students. They participate in the hiring process and collaborate with their colleagues to mentor and support School Social Workers to improve the effectiveness of student support services.

 

·       Work collaboratively with all school personnel to create a positive learning community.

·       Develop and maintain a written plan of data driven goals and strategies for effective delivery of the school social work program based on national best practices, individual school data, current relevant research findings, and the School Improvement Plan.

·       Assist in identifying professional development opportunities.

·       Participate in the hiring process.

·       Collaborate and mentor colleagues to support School Social Workers to improve the effectiveness of student support services.

 

 

b. School Social Workers enhance the social work profession.

 

School Social Workers strive to enhance the social work profession. School Social Workers contribute to the establishment of positive working conditions in their schools, districts, state, and nation. School Social Workers actively participate in and advocate for decision-making structures in education and government that utilize the expertise of School Social Workers. School Social Workers communicate the goals of the school social work program to stakeholders. School Social Workers maintain current and appropriate resources to improve the relationship among home, school, and community. School Social Workers promote professional growth and collaborate with their colleagues to improve the profession.

 

·       Strive to enhance the profession.

·       Contribute to the establishment of positive working conditions.

·       Participate and advocate in decision-making structures.

·       Communicate the goals of the school social work program to stakeholders.

·       Maintain current and appropriate resources to improve the relationship among home, school, and community.

·       Promote professional growth and collaborate with their colleagues.

 

c. School Social Workers advocate for students, families, schools, and communities.

 

School Social Workers advocate for positive change in policies and practices affecting student learning. School Social Workers support the School Improvement Plan and student academic success through developing and utilizing internal and external partnerships and resources. They participate in the implementation of initiatives to improve educational and support services.

 

·       Advocate for positive change in policies and practices affecting student learning.

·       Develop and utilize internal and external partnerships and resources.

·       Participate in the implementation of initiatives to improve student educational and support services.

 

d. School Social Workers demonstrate high ethical standards.

 

School Social Workers adhere to the laws, policies, procedures, and ethical standards of the social work profession. School Social Workers demonstrate ethical principles including honesty, integrity, fair treatment, and respect for others. School Social Workers uphold the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics, revised 1999 (http://www.socialworkers.org/pubs/code/code.asp), The Code of Ethics for North Carolina Educators (effective June 1, 1997), and the Standards for Professional Conduct (adopted April 1, 1998).

 

·       Adhere to the laws, policies, procedures, and ethical standards of the social work profession.

·       Demonstrate ethical principles.

·       Uphold the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics.

·       Uphold the Code of Ethics and Standards for the Professional Conduct.

 

STANDARD 2: SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKERS PROMOTE A RESPECTFUL ENVIRONMENT FOR DIVERSE POPULATIONS.

 

School Social Workers promote a positive school environment in which individual differences are respected. School Social Workers educate school personnel on the correlation between a positive school climate and student achievement. School Social Workers understand and respect the impact of how student learning is influenced by culture, community, family, and individual experiences. School Social Workers recognize the need to educate the school staff on emerging issues within the home, school, and community. The School Social Worker understands the ways in which similar behaviors may have different meanings to people in different cultures.

 

a. School Social Workers promote an environment in which each student has a positive, nurturing relationship with caring adults.

 

School Social Workers encourage an environment that is inviting, respectful, supportive, inclusive, and flexible. School Social Workers provide leadership and collaborate with other school personnel to provide effective school social work services. School Social Workers implement developmentally-appropriate and prevention-oriented group activities to meet student needs and school goals.

 

·       Encourage an environment that is inviting, respectful, supportive, inclusive, and flexible.

·       Provide leadership and collaborate with other school personnel to provide effective school social work services.

·       Implement developmentally-appropriate and prevention-oriented group activities to meet student needs and school goals.

 

b. School Social Workers embrace diversity in the school, home, community, and world.

 

School Social Workers demonstrate their knowledge of diverse cultures. School Social Workers also understand the role of diverse cultures in shaping global, state, and school issues. School Social Workers recognize the influence of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, language, and other aspects of culture on a student’s development and personality. School Social Workers strive to understand how students’ culture and background may influence their school performance. School Social Workers consider and incorporate different points of view in the professional development provided for school personnel. School Social Workers actively select materials and develop activities that counteract stereotypes and incorporate histories and contributions of all cultures.

 

·       Demonstrate their knowledge of diverse cultures.

·       Understand the role of diverse cultures in shaping global, state, and school issues.

·       Recognize the influences of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, language, and other aspects of culture on a student’s development and personality.

·       Understand how students’ culture and background may influence their school performance.

·       Consider and incorporate different points of view.

·       Select materials and develop activities that counteract stereotypes and incorporate contributions of all cultures.

 

c. School Social Workers treat students as individuals.

 

School Social Workers maintain high expectations, including graduation from high school, for students of all backgrounds. School Social Workers appreciate differences and value the contributions of each student in the learning environment by building positive, appropriate relationships. School Social Workers assist students, individually and/or in groups, with developing academic, social, emotional, and psychological skills.

 

·       Maintain high expectations for all students.

·       Appreciate differences and value the contributions of each student in the learning environment by building positive, appropriate relationships.

·       Assist students, individually and/or in groups, with developing academic, social, emotional, and psychological skills.

 

d. School Social Workers provide services that benefit students with special needs.

 

School Social Workers collaborate with administrators, teachers, and a range of specialists to help meet the special needs of all students. School Social Workers may participate in the evaluation process by conducting the student social/developmental history and parent interviews. School Social Workers engage students to ensure that their academic, social, emotional, and psychological needs are effectively met by conducting individual/group counseling.

 

·       Collaborate with administrators, teachers, and a range of specialists to help meet the special needs of all students.

·       Participate in the evaluation process by conducting the student social/developmental history and parent interviews.

·       Engage students to ensure that their academic, social, emotional, and psychological needs are effectively met by conducting individual/group counseling.

 

e. School Social Workers work collaboratively with families and significant adults in the lives of students.

 

School Social Workers recognize that educating students is a shared responsibility involving the students, families, schools, and communities. School Social Workers improve communication and collaboration among the school, home, and community in order to promote trust and understanding and to build partnerships with all segments of the school community. School Social Workers seek solutions to barriers that inhibit effective familial and community involvement in the education of students.

 

·       Improve communication and collaboration among the school, home, and community.

·       Promote trust and understanding to build partnerships among school, home, and community.

·       Seek solutions to barriers that inhibit familial and community involvement in the education of students.

 

STANDARD 3: SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKERS APPLY THE SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE OF THEIR PROFESSION WITHIN EDUCATIONAL SETTINGS.

 

School Social Workers utilize theories and skills necessary to enhance the interconnectedness of home, school, community, and student success. School Social Workers consult and collaborate through multidisciplinary teams to improve service delivery. School Social Workers encourage and model relationships that are critical to a rigorous and relevant education. School Social Workers provide proven and promising interventions that address barriers to academic achievement. School Social Workers align their services with the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and national best practices.

 

a. School Social Workers deliver comprehensive services unique to their specialty area.

 

School Social Workers bring a richness and depth of understanding of students, families, schools, and communities. School Social Workers utilize skills such as advocacy, assessment, consultation, counseling, and collaboration to create and implement developmentally appropriate and targeted interventions to meet the identified needs of students, families, schools, and communities. School Social Workers support and encourage student and family involvement in the school process.

 

·       Understand students, families, schools, and communities.

·       Utilize skills such as advocacy, assessment, consultation, counseling, and collaboration to create and implement developmentally appropriate and targeted interventions to meet the identified needs of students, families, schools, and communities.

·       Support and encourage student and family involvement.

 

b. School Social Workers possess effective communication skills.

 

School Social Workers are perceptive listeners and are able to communicate effectively with students, families, school staff, and communities even when language is a barrier.

 

·       Communicate effectively with students, families, school staff, and communities even when language is a barrier.

·       School Social Workers recognize the interconnectedness of academic, social, emotional, and psychological development and societal challenges. School Social Workers comprehend the link between school social work services and the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. School Social Workers understand the implications of demographic and socio-economic factors that influence student achievement. School Social Workers promote global awareness and its relevance to the development of the whole child for the twenty-first century.

·       Understand the implications of demographic and socio-economic factors that influence student achievement.

·       Promote global awareness and its relevance to the development of the whole child for the twenty-first century.

 

 

c. School Social Workers facilitate student acquisition of 21st century skills.

 

School Social Workers incorporate 21st century life skills deliberately, strategically, and broadly into their services. These skills include leadership, ethics, accountability, adaptability, personal productivity, personal responsibility, interpersonal skills, self-direction, and social responsibility. School Social Workers help students understand the relationship between the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and twenty-first century content, which includes global awareness; financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy, civic literacy, and health and wellness awareness. School Social Workers facilitate student understanding of the 21st century content relevant to academic, social, emotional, and psychological success.

 

·       Incorporate life skills which include leadership, ethics, accountability, adaptability, personal productivity, personal responsibility, interpersonal skills, self-direction, and social responsibility.

·       Demonstrate the relationship between the core content and 21st century content that includes global awareness; financial, economic, business, and entrepreneurial literacy; civic literacy; and health and wellness awareness.

·       Facilitate student understanding of the 21st century content relevant to academic, social, emotional, and psychological success.

 

STANDARD 4: SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKERS SUPPORT STUDENT LEARNING.

 

The School Social Worker understands how the students’ social, emotional, psychological, and environmental factors influence academic performance and achievement. School Social Workers understand the need for early intervention and prevention when addressing these factors. School Social Workers collaborate with parents to aid their understanding of their role as an active participant in the student’s education performance. School Social Workers develop intervention plans that address student needs and promote academic success.

 

a. School Social Workers use a variety of strength-based methods.

 

School Social Workers address the achievement gap by assessing student strengths and needs, and by implementing proven and promising interventions. School Social Workers provide a wide range of prevention, early intervention, and crisis response strategies to address social, emotional, psychological, and academic needs. School Social Workers collaborate and consult with administrators, instructional and support staff, parents, and the community to support student learning. School Social Workers provide professional development to promote early identification of unmet needs; increase awareness of relevant laws, policies, and procedures; and encourage empathy and understanding of the whole child.

 

·       Address the achievement gap by assessing student strengths and needs and by implementing proven and promising interventions.

·       Provide a wide range of prevention, early intervention, and crisis response strategies to address social, emotional, psychological, and academic needs.

·       Collaborate and consult with administrators, instructional and support staff, parents, and the community to support student learning.

·       Provide professional development to promote early identification of unmet needs, increase awareness of relevant laws, policies, and procedures, and encourage empathy and understanding of the whole child.

 

b. School Social Workers help students develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

 

School Social Workers address issues that interfere with the student’s ability to problem solve and think critically. School Social Workers assist students in developing skills necessary to communicate effectively, synthesize knowledge, think creatively, and make informed decisions through individual and group work.

 

·       Address issues that interfere with the students’ ability to problem solve and think critically.

·       Assist students in developing skills necessary to communicate effectively, synthesize knowledge, think creatively, and make informed decisions through individual and group work.

 

c. School Social Workers support students as they develop leadership qualities.

 

School Social Workers help students strengthen interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, improve communication skills, understand cultural differences, and develop leadership qualities.

 

·       Strengthen interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, improve communication skills, understand cultural differences, and develop leadership qualities

 

STANDARD 5: SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKERS ACTIVELY REFLECT ON THEIR PRACTICE.

 

School Social Workers are accountable for managing and providing services that strengthen home, school, and community partnerships in support of student learning. School Social Workers use formal and informal assessments to collect, analyze, and evaluate strategies for effective service delivery. School Social Workers utilize collaborative relationships with colleagues, families, and communities to reflect and improve their practice.

 

a. School Social Workers analyze student learning.

 

School Social Workers think systematically and critically about students’ social, emotional, psychological, and academic success. School Social Workers collect and analyze student data to plan and evaluate the effectiveness of service delivery. School Social Workers adapt their practice based on current relevant research findings and data to best meet the needs of students, families, schools, and communities.

 

·       Think systematically and critically about students’ social, emotional, psychological, and academic success

·       Collect and analyze student data to plan and evaluate the effectiveness of service delivery

·       Adapt their practice based on current relevant research findings and data to best meet the needs of students, families, schools, and communities

 

b. School Social Workers link professional growth to their professional goals.

 

School Social Workers continually participate in high quality professional development specific to school social work practice. School Social Workers also understand a global view of educational practices, including twenty-first century skills and knowledge aligned with the State Board of Education priorities and initiatives.

 

·       Participate in high quality professional development specific to school social work practice.

 

c. School Social Workers function effectively in a complex, dynamic environment.

 

School Social Workers understand that change is constant; therefore, they actively investigate and consider new ideas that support students’ social, emotional, psychological, and academic success. School Social Workers adapt their practice based on current research findings and data to best meet the needs of all students.

 

·       Actively investigate and consider new ideas that support students’ social, emotional, psychological, and academic success.

·       Adapt their practice based on current research findings and data.

 


 

Standards for Technology Facilitator Evaluation

 

NORTH CAROLINA PROFESSIONAL TECHNOLOGY FACILITATOR STANDARDS

 

Demands of a 21st century education dictate strong roles for Instructional Technology Facilitators. In order to bring consensus and common, shared ownership of the vision and purpose of the work of the school, Instructional Technology Facilitators provide, promote, and participate in shared leadership. They are valued for leading a strong and comprehensive school instructional technology program which provides tools, resources, and content that promote critical thinking, problem solving, and information and communications literacy while also making content engaging, relevant, and meaningful to students. Instructional Technology Facilitators encourage student-owned 21st century learning including collaboration, communication, critical thinking and creativity. They enable teaching in all content areas including global awareness, civic literacy, financial literacy, and health awareness. Instructional Technology Facilitators demonstrate the value of lifelong learning and encourage the school community to learn and grow. They are reflective about their practice and promote inclusion and analysis of assessments that are authentic, structured and demonstrate student understanding.

 

 

STANDARD 1: INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY FACILITATORS DEMONSTRATE LEADERSHIP.


Instructional Technology Facilitators demonstrate 21st century leadership in the school.

Instructional Technology Facilitators lead in the use of 21st century tools and skills. They promote a vision of technology-enabled teaching and learning that includes use of best instructional practices and access to current information and technology tools. Instructional Technology Facilitators understand and apply principles of adult learning to design and deliver relevant, engaging, and differentiated professional development. They support the school and district’s overall vision for ensuring that every public school student will graduate from high school, globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and prepared for life in the 21st century.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

·       Provide effective leadership and support for establishing, promoting and sustaining a seamless use of 21st century technology tools and information resources.

·       Serve as leaders in the planning, implementation and deployment of a 21st century digital conversion, including devices, curriculum, pedagogy, professional development and appropriate digital resources.

·       Make effective use of data to assess how the instructional technology program meets the needs of the school community.

·       Provide leadership in determining student and educator technology needs based on demographic and performance data, curricular needs, state and national guidelines, professional best practices, and emerging trends.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators lead an instructional technology program that supports 21st century teaching and learning.

Instructional Technology Facilitators collaboratively create, align, and implement programs guided by state and national guidelines and research-based best practices. Instructional Technology Facilitators align program goals with local strategic plans placing a priority on student learning and curriculum requirements. They exhibit flexibility, adaptability, and resourcefulness in an ever-changing technology environment. The instructional technology program offers an effective teaching and learning best practices model in the 21st century digital conversion of the school in support of student success.

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

·       Align the mission, resources and activities of the instructional technology program with the North Carolina Essential Standards and Common Core State Standards and the local goals and priorities for teaching and learning.

·       Communicate the vision and requirements of an effective technology-enabled instructional technology program to appropriate stakeholders while utilizing relevant and current research and other data-informed performance measures and outcomes.

·       Evaluate and collaboratively select digital tools and resources based on professional best practices and relevant data.

·       Demonstrate fluency with a wide range of digital resources which support inquiry and student-centered learning, professional best practices and acquisition of 21st century skills.

·      Ensure that the instructional technology program tools and resources support the diverse developmental, cultural, social, and linguistic needs of students and their communities.

·      Provide professional development addressing instructional theory, practice and resources that promote student owned learning, relevancy, 21st century skills, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity.

·       Evaluate the program to ensure that it is up-to-date and relevant, meeting the needs of the school community.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators advocate for effective instructional technology programs.

Effective technology facilitators model and apply information and technology standards as they design and implement learning experiences for both students and educators. Combining their broad content, pedagogical and technology understanding they advance student learning, creativity and innovation in both traditional and virtual environments.

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

    Facilitate equity of access for diverse and appropriate digital tools and resources including personal computing devices and digital textbooks.

    Encourage educator designed inquiry-based learning using various and appropriate resources and tools to improve creative and innovative student learning.

·       Advocate to ensure that the program’s digital tools and resources are highly available, reliable and flexibly accessible.

·       Advocate for equitable access and appropriate use of information and technology resources.

·       Facilitate meaningful communication and collaboration among stakeholders while modeling and supporting the ethical and safe use of information and technology resources.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators promote and facilitate effective collaboration among educators within and beyond the school setting.

Instructional Technology Facilitators generate positive student outcomes by leading, modeling and promoting effective collaborative practices that support and create an effective learning community. They demonstrate persistence, creativity, and openness in establishing relationships and building partnerships. They review data to inform instructional planning while collaborating to design, deliver, and evaluate instruction based on research and best practices. They work collaboratively to identify and select resources for curriculum support and partner with teachers to create instruction that is enhanced and enabled by relevant and effective digital tools and resources.

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

    Foster collaboration within the school community to facilitate design, delivery, and assessment of instructional activities that promote learner competence and confidence with 21st century skills.

    Use research-based strategies that seamlessly integrate content with technology tools and information resources through community collaboration and partnerships.

    Collaborate with other appropriate stakeholders both face-to-face and virtually to address student and professional achievement.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators demonstrate high ethical standards.

Instructional Technology Facilitators demonstrate ethical principles including honesty, integrity, fair treatment, and respect for others. Teachers uphold the Code of Ethics for North Carolina Educators (effective June 1, 1997) and the Standards for Professional Conduct adopted April 1, 1998.  www.ncptsc.org

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

·       Uphold the Code of Ethics for North Carolina Educators and Standards for the Professional Conduct.

·       Model ethical principles including safe, legal and ethical use of digital resources and tools including copyright, intellectual property, digital etiquette and virtual social interactions.

 

STANDARD 2:  INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY FACILITATORS DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF LEARNERS AND LEARNING AND PROMOTE EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES IN A 21ST CENTURY LEARNING ENVIRONMENT.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators use effective pedagogy to infuse the curriculum with 21st century content and tools.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators understand and apply research-based pedagogical strategies to design and deliver rigorous, relevant, and engaging differentiated instruction. Instructional Technology Facilitators are knowledgeable of learning styles, stages of human growth and development, and cultural influences on learning. They support the learning of all members of the school community, including those with diverse learning styles, physical and intellectual abilities, and needs. They effectively facilitate the integration of 21st century skills, particularly technology use, and instructional design, delivery, and assessment. Instructional Technology Facilitators creatively infuse content-area instruction with 21st century skills.

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

·       Facilitate the use of accepted learning taxonomies, effective instructional design principles, and appropriate assessment methods.

·       Enable and enhance instruction across the curriculum to promote engagement, creativity, critical thinking, problem-solving and student-owned exploration of information and ideas.

·       Use a variety of instructional strategies, 21st century resources, and assessment tools to design and develop digital-age learning for all learners.

·       Support differentiation of instruction by demonstrating flexibility and creativity in choosing and modifying learning strategies, tools, and resources in various formats to meet all learners’ needs.

·       Collaboratively design and facilitate appropriate assessment of student-owned products utilizing 21st skills within all content areas.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators know the content appropriate to their teaching specialty.

Instructional Technology Facilitators model digital literacy and safety, and the ethical use of information and technology utilizing best practices and relevant research-based methods and techniques. They articulate the value and importance of the North Carolina Essential Standards and Common Core State Standards to members of the school community. They assist teachers in seamlessly integrating technology into curriculum-based lessons and instructional units and providing 21st century learning experiences. They collaborate with other educators to design and facilitate use of innovative technology assisted student outcome measurement systems.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

    Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of curriculum goals across grade levels and subject areas.

    Promote global digital literacy, awareness and cultural understanding by facilitating collaboration and communication using 21st century tools and resources.

·       Collaboratively design and facilitate appropriate assessment of student-owned products utilizing 21st skills within all content areas.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators model, share, and promote effective principles of teaching and learning.

They use a variety of instructional strategies and assessment tools to model and promote digital-age learning experiences and apply their expertise to coach others in collaboration, digital literacy, 21st century communication, inquiry-based learning, and digital citizenship. Instructional Technology Facilitators demonstrate and facilitate the effective use of 21st century tools and resources to encourage meaningful and authentic learning experiences.

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

    Facilitate access to information, resources, and ongoing support to assist teachers in implementing research-based best practices using 21st century tools and resources.

    Design differentiated instruction using a variety of research-based strategies and various digital resources to meet learner needs.

    Provide teachers with professional development, modeling the effective integration of information and technology skills, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity.

·       Model effective formative assessment practices including alternative assessment strategies.

·       Use effective interpersonal and listening skills to discover students’ interests and assist them in finding engaging and appropriate digital tools and resources for use in their student-owned learning strategies.

 

STANDARD 3: INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY FACILITATORS FACILITATE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE 21ST CENTURY INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators serve as a specialist, fostering the effective use of digital tools and resources for constructing and sharing knowledge using inquiry-based instruction.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators use creative strategies to promote the available digital tools and resources as well as the special skills and expertise of the Technology Facilitator. They demonstrate flexibility to make their skills and expertise, as well as school technology resources, readily available to and easily accessible to all members of the school community. They help learners become discerning and effective users of digital resources and tools promoting the seamless integration of technology to meet curricular goals. Instructional Technology Facilitators encourage teachers and students to apply an inquiry-based approach to learning and they actively support instructional practices and pedagogy that promote creativity and critical thinking. They promote digital citizenship and guide students to build a positive academic digital footprint. They model the effective use of new and emerging technologies. They also collaboratively develop technology program policies and procedures that respect and meet the needs of a diverse school community and facilitate access to equitable digital tools and resources.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

 

·       Communicate and implement policies and procedures based on state and federal requirements.

·       Demonstrate best practices in the integration of information and technology skills and resources in all areas of the curriculum while modeling and supporting engagement through inquiry-based learning.

·       Encourage and enable use of digital tools and resources for inquiry, knowledge creation, and sharing student-owned learning.

·       Contribute to the development and implementation of the school improvement plan.

 

STANDARD 4: INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY FACILITATORS BUILD A LEARNING ENVIRONMENT THAT MEETS THE INSTRUCTIONAL NEEDS OF ALL STUDENTS.

Instructional Technology Facilitators establish a participatory learning environment that facilitates collaboration among all members of the learning community and honors diversity.

Using 21st century tools and resources, Instructional Technology Facilitators encourage active learning, promote collaboration, and provide flexibility to accommodate multiple learning styles, work strategies and abilities. Instructional Technology Facilitators foster relationships with and between students while applying a global perspective and meeting the learning needs of a diverse student population.

·       Instructional Technology Facilitators establish a diverse, collaborative and engaging learning environment that promotes global awareness, cultural understanding, creativity, inquiry, critical thinking, collaboration and communication. Understand and incorporate universal design considerations to facilitate equitable access to content and resources.

 

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators seamlessly integrate content-area curricula with 21st century content, effective pedagogical practices, universal design principles, and appropriate technology applications for all learners.

Instructional Technology Facilitators model and promote the seamless and ubiquitous integration of content and technology tools and resources to meet widely diverse student needs. Instructional Technology Facilitators are a constant in the learning environment of the student over time. As such, they have a unique opportunity to gain a more holistic view of students, understand learners as they progress through each developmental stage, and encourage learners to cultivate creativity and critical thinking habits.

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

 

·       Collaboratively identify students’ interests, learning styles, and unique instructional requirements.

·       Facilitate the design and delivery of data-informed differentiated instruction guided by universal design principles and pedagogical strategies promoting mastery of 21st century tools and content.

·       Promote and model the use of information and technology resources while using innovative strategies to support the dynamic participation and engagement of all learners.

 

STANDARD 5: INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY FACILITATORS ACTIVELY REFLECT ON THEIR PRACTICE.

Instructional Technology Facilitators analyze student learning.

Instructional Technology Facilitators use formative and summative assessments to collaboratively analyze data and evaluate other indicators of student learning to inform instruction.

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

·       Analyze data both collaboratively and individually to inform instructional and professional practices and future program planning.

·       Use data from multiple sources, including student, teacher, school, district, and local community, to make decisions that improve the effectiveness of the instructional technology program while supporting student achievement.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators link professional growth to their professional goals.

Instructional Technology Facilitators actively seek professional development to help them maintain a leadership role as a teacher, technology specialist, and coach in the use of current and emerging technologies..

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

 

    Complete professional development and participate in local and global professional learning communities to explore creative applications and enhancements for improving professional practice and student learning.

    Actively explore and integrate emerging technologies, resources, information formats, and innovative practices to support student achievement.

 

Instructional Technology Facilitators function effectively in a complex, dynamic environment.

Instructional Technology Facilitators demonstrate leadership and flexibility in adapting to a rapidly changing information and technology environment. They act as leaders in coaching teachers, administrators, and students to thrive in a complex technology landscape. They continuously seek current best practices and adapt their professional practice based on research and student data to support school goals.

Instructional Technology Facilitators:

·       Participate in observations for professional growth and collaborate with other educators to mentor and support professional growth throughout the school learning community.

·       Apply professional skills to investigate, apply, and share new research on digital tools, resources, pedagogy, curriculum, and other relevant topics to the professional learning community.

 


 

Standards for School Library Media Coordinator Evaluation

 

NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA COORDINATORS STANDARDS

 

The demands of providing a 21st century education dictate new roles for School Library Media Coordinators.  School Library Media Coordinators are called on to have a larger role in their schools and school communities.  School leadership is distributed among the staff and administration in order to bring consensus, common understandings, and shared ownership of the vision and purpose of the school.  School Library Media Coordinators are valued for their leadership abilities throughout the school as well as in the media center.

 

School Library Media Coordinators help make the content engaging and meaningful to students’ lives as they support teachers and facilitate the integration of curriculum and related projects across disciplines.  In the school and the media center, School Library Media Coordinators facilitate instruction, encouraging all students to use 21st century skills to discover how to learn, innovate, collaborate, and communicate their ideas.  They serve as facilitators of information skills development through the provision of professional development, coaching, mentoring, and co-teaching activities.  Their work includes supporting the development of authentic and structured assessment strategies to assure that students demonstrate understanding of the content taught and ability to apply the skills they have learned.  School Library Media Coordinators demonstrate the value of lifelong learning and instill a love of reading and learning in the students with whom they come into contact.

 

STANDARD 1: SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA COORDINATORS DEMONSTRATE LEADERSHIP. 

 

School Library Media Coordinators lead in the school library media center and media program to support student success.

 

School Library Media Coordinators provide leadership for the school library media program. They share responsibility for the progress of all students to ensure that they graduate from high school, are globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and are prepared for life in the 21st Century. They collaboratively create, align, and implement a program informed by state and national guidelines and research-based best practices. They transform the library media center into a 21st century learning environment (both virtual and physical) and a shared space for knowledge construction, collaboration and inquiry-based learning, and they assist teachers with similar transformations. They coordinate the activities and training of library media support personnel including volunteers.

 

School Library Media Coordinators:

    Align the mission, policies, resources and activities of the school’s library media program with the North Carolina Essential Standards and Common Core State Standards, local goals, and priorities for teaching and learning.

    Collaborate with and support other members of the school community to select materials and promote library services and resources within the school.

    Foster collaboration with teachers in their school community to facilitate the design, delivery, and assessment of instructional activities that promote learner competence and confidence with 21st century skills.

    Provide leadership and support for establishing, promoting, and sustaining the effective use of information resources and technology tools.

    Establish the library media center as both a physical and virtual shared learning space for 21st century teaching and learning and opportunities for students to be engaged in collaboration, and inquiry-based learning.

    Represent the reading interests and curricular needs of all students in selecting and promoting information and technology resources and tools.

    Use learner-centered instructional strategies and resources to model the   integration of multiple literacies with content curriculum.

 

School Library Media Coordinators lead in their schools.

School Library Media Coordinators work collaboratively with school personnel to create a professional learning community.  They analyze data to develop goals and strategies in the school improvement plan that enhance student learning. They provide input in determining the school budget and in the selection and provision of professional development that meets the needs of the students, the staff, and their own professional growth.  They participate in the hiring process and collaborate with their colleagues to support teachers in the improvement of the effectiveness of their departments or grade levels.  They establish positive working relationships and communicate with other educators to identify and select resources for curriculum support. They also partner with teachers to design instruction that seamlessly integrates 21st century skills, information fluency, and digital literacy across the curriculum. 

School Library Media Coordinators:

    Contribute to the development and implementation of the school improvement plan.

    Participate in shared decision making addressing all aspects of the school library media center’s function.

    Participate with classroom teachers in professional learning communities to address student and professional achievement.

    Support teachers’ efforts to infuse multiple literacies and 21st century skills within content-area instruction.

    Foster collaboration among members of the school community to meet the school improvement goals.

    Model and make effective use of 21st century tools for communication and collaboration.

    Support the school’s conversion to 21st century technology, curriculum, pedagogy, professional development, and appropriate digital resources.

    Provide technology-enabled one-on-one and group professional development for classroom teachers.

    Provide professional development in integrating information and instructional technology skills into all curricular areas.

    Apply principles of adult learning to provide relevant, engaging and differentiated professional development.

    Assist in designing effective school and classroom alternative assessment of in 21st century skills.

 

School Library Media Coordinators advocate for effective media programs.

 

School Library Media Coordinators are proactive in communicating the vision, requirements and impact of an effective 21st century library media program to key stakeholders using relevant research, evidence of student learning, and other outcomes. They advocate for information fluency, inquiry-based learning, curriculum fidelity, creativity, planning, innovation and reading for enjoyment and lifelong learning to ensure that all students have access to proper learning resources and are prepared for the future.

School Library Media Coordinators:

    Advocate for and model the seamless integration of core content with technology tools and information resources.

    Advocate for equitable access to digital information, resources and tools for all students.  Cultivate relationships with and communicate resource needs to decision makers and stakeholders and advocate for library resources that support the entire school community.

    Establish connections with community agencies and other libraries to strengthen cooperation and increase opportunities for resource sharing.

 

School Library Media Coordinators demonstrate high ethical standards.

School Library Media Coordinators demonstrate ethical principles including honesty, integrity, fair treatment, and respect for others. They uphold the Code of Ethics for North Carolina Educators (effective June 1, 1997) and the Standards for Professional Conduct adopted April 1, 1998. 

School Library Media Coordinators:

    Uphold the Code of Ethics for North Carolina Educators and Standards for Professional Conduct.

    Apply professional standards and guidelines for school library media programs, ethical codes, and principles of education and information professions in decision making.

    Model and guide best practices in copyright, ethical access and use of information and technology resources, intellectual property, digital citizenship, and safety for the school community. 

    Demonstrate and foster appropriate digital citizenship and safety practices for all school community members.

 

STANDARD 2: SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA COORDINATORS BUILD A LEARNING ENVIRONMENT THAT MEETS THE INSTRUCTIONAL NEEDS OF A DIVERSE POPULATION OF STUDENTS.

School Library Media Coordinators establish a learning environment that facilitates access to resources and addresses the learning needs of all members of the school community.

 

School Library Media Coordinators create a welcoming and accessible physical space that facilitates active learning, promotes participation and collaboration and teamwork, and provides flexibility to accommodate multiple learning styles, 21st century skills, and reading enjoyment.  School Library Media Coordinators incorporate a global view and multiculturalism in library services, programming, and collection development to meet the personal interests and learning needs of a diverse student population.  They develop and implement strategies to remove barriers to open, equitable access to the library media center and its resources.

School Library Media Coordinators:

    Establish a learning environment that promotes global awareness and cultural understanding.

    Promote and facilitate open, equitable access and appropriate use of all information and technology resources.

    Respect and meet the needs of a diverse school community.

    Provide accessible and flexible physical and virtual learning spaces to foster 21st century skills.

 

School Library Media Coordinators provide appropriate resources, services, and instruction for learners at all stages of development.

 

School Library Media Coordinators model and promote the seamless integration of content and information, pedagogy, and technology to meet diverse student needs.  They incorporate universal design to facilitate equitable access to information and resources for learning.  They encourage the cultivation of creativity, reading interests, and critical thinking across multiple years of students’ school careers.

 

School Library Media Coordinators:

    Collaborate with teachers and other specialists to identify students’ interests, learning styles, and unique instructional requirements and to design instructional strategies guided by universal design principles

    Use technology skills and innovative strategies to support the dynamic participation and engagement of all learners, including those with special needs.

    Encourage all learners to establish and maintain a positive digital footprint as they interact in web-enabled environments.

 

 

STANDARD 3: SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA COORDINATORS IMPLEMENT A COMPREHENSIVE 21ST CENTURY LIBRARY MEDIA PROGRAM.

 

School Library Media Coordinators develop a library collection that supports 21st century teaching and learning.

 

School Library Media Coordinators develop an appropriate and high quality library media collection that facilitates 21st century teaching and learning.  They use collection mapping and other collection analysis tools to ensure that the collection is dynamic, learner-centered, supports the North Carolina Essential Standards and Common Core State Standards, and meets the unique needs of the school and its learners. 

 

School Library Media Coordinators:

·       Continuously evaluate the library media collection to ensure that it is accurate and current and meets teacher and student needs for recreational reading and curriculum-based materials in a variety of formats.

·       Collaborate with members of the school community in assessing needs and using needs assessment information to inform the school’s collection development plan.

·       Evaluate and select new resources based on the collection development plan.

·       Exercise professional judgment in selecting resources that reflect the diverse developmental, cultural, social, and linguistic needs of students.

·       Collaborate with local technical staff to ensure that digital resources are easily accessible and reliable.

 

School Library Media Coordinators serve, promote and facilitate inquiry-based instruction and the effective use of information and technology.

 

School Library Media Coordinators make their skills and expertise as well as the learning space and resources of the library media center flexibly available and easily accessible to all members of the school community.  They help learners become discerning and effective users of information and ideas, and they promote the seamless integration of curriculum, pedagogy and technology to meet curricular goals.  They encourage teachers and students to apply an inquiry-based approach to learning and actively support instructional practices that promote creativity and critical thinking.

 

School Library Media Coordinators:

·    Demonstrate best practices in the integration of information and technology skills and resources in all areas of the curriculum while modeling and supporting inquiry-based learning.

·    Encourage and enable use of the library media center and its resources as a shared learning space.

 

 

STANDARD 4:  SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA COORDINATORS DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF LEARNERS AND LEARNING AND PROMOTE EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES.

School Library Media Coordinators use effective pedagogy to infuse content-area curricula with 21st century skills.

 

School Library Media Coordinators integrate 21st century skills in instructional design, delivery, and assessment to meet curriculum objectives and produce positive learning outcomes for students.  They promote best instructional practices and curriculum fidelity through collaboration and support to educators.  They model and facilitate access to current information and technology tools and participatory and social learning.

School Library Media Coordinators:

    Use a variety of instructional strategies, resources, and assessment tools to provide digital-age learning experiences.

    Model, promote, and facilitate the seamless integration of information and technology tools and resources across all content areas.

    Support differentiation of instruction by choosing and modifying learning strategies, tools, and resources to meet the needs of all learners.

 

School Library Media Coordinators know the content appropriate to their teaching specialty.

 

School Library Media Coordinators model, promote, and support other educators in the effective use of information resources, best practices in research, multiple literacies, digital safety, and the ethical use of information and technology resources.  They collaboratively develop and utilize research-based pedagogical strategies to make the curriculum rigorous and relevant for all students and provide a balanced curriculum that enhances literacy skills.  They apply the content standards for students developed by their professional organizations.   School Library Media Coordinators collaboratively design, use, and communicate innovative outcome measures to identify evidence of student learning using 21st century skills across all curriculum areas.

School Library Media Coordinators:

·       Demonstrate knowledge of curriculum goals across grade levels and subject areas.

·       Model and promote multiple strategies in locating, evaluating and using a wide range of information and technology resources in an ethical and appropriate manner.

·       Foster global literacy, awareness and cultural understanding by facilitating the access and use of information from a variety of sources.

·       Collaborate, model and promote effective strategies for accessing, evaluating, and synthesizing information resources to support teaching and learning.

·       Encourage and support all members of the learning community to synthesize and properly cite information from multiple sources and to communicate using a variety of modes and strategies.

·       Demonstrate effective strategies to discover student interests and learning styles and to assist them in finding engaging and appropriate information resources.

·       Utilize knowledge of appropriate assessment strategies to collaboratively design and facilitate innovative assessment of information and technology skills within content areas.

 

School Library Media Coordinators promote reading as a foundational skill for learning.

 

School Library Media Coordinators champion reading for information, pleasure and lifelong learning.  They build relationships with students to discover reading interests and assist in finding engaging and appropriate materials to encourage a love of reading.  They partner with teachers in identifying the reading interests and needs of students and recommending appropriate resources.

School Library Media Coordinators:

    Collaboratively plan learning experiences that offer whole classes, small groups, and individual learners an interdisciplinary approach to learning and direct students’ curiosity into an interest in reading for learning and pleasure.  

    Recommend and use appropriate resources to scaffold and support multiple learning styles and intelligences, reading abilities and interests.

    Model, promote and support other educators in reading and writing and interaction in multiple formats and media.

    Collaboratively design, deliver, and assess instructional activities that empower learners to read across multiple formats and media.

    Use a variety of strategies to promote leisure reading.

 

STANDARD 5: SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA COORDINATORS REFLECT ON THEIR PRACTICE.

 

School Library Media Coordinators analyze student learning. 

 

School Library Media Coordinators use formative and summative assessments to collect data about student learning in the library media center and its impact on student achievement.  They use multiple sources and types of data to improve their professional practice.

 

School Library Media Coordinators:

    Collect evidence regarding the effectiveness of the school library media program. 

    Use data on student learning and achievement to improve their professional practice and future program planning.

    Conduct action research to determine the impact of library services on student achievement.

 

 

School Library Media Coordinators link professional growth to their professional goals. 

 

School Library Media Coordinators actively seek ongoing professional development to improve their practice and the effectiveness of the library media program.

 

    School Library Media Coordinators complete professional development and participate in professional learning communities to explore effective applications and enhancements for improving professional practice.

 

School Library Media Coordinators function effectively in a complex, dynamic environment. 

 

School Library Media Coordinators adapt to a rapidly changing information and technology environment.  They thrive in an increasingly digital information landscape and continuously adapt their professional practice based on research and student data to support school goals.

 

School Library Media Coordinators:

    Seek input from colleagues and students regarding needed improvements to their professional practice.

    Apply professional skills to investigate and apply to their practice current research on information resources, technology, pedagogy, and curriculum.


 

Standards for Principal and Assistant Principal Evaluation

North Carolina PROFESSIONAL Standards for School Executives

A New Vision of School Leadership

Public education’s changed mission dictates the need for a new type of school leader -- an executive instead of an administrator.  No longer are school leaders just maintaining the status quo by managing complex operations but just like their colleagues in business, they must be able to create schools as organizations that can learn and change quickly if they are to improve performance.  Schools need executives who are adept at creating systems for change and at building relationships with and across staff that not only tap into the collective knowledge and insight they possess but powerful relationships that also stir their passions for their work with children. Out of these relationships the executive must create among staff a common shared understanding for the purpose of the work of the school, its values that direct its action, and commitment and ownership of a set of beliefs and goals that focus everyone’s decision making.  The staff’s common understanding of the school’s identity empowers them to seek and build powerful alliances and partnerships with students, parents and community stakeholders in order to enhance their ability to produce increased student achievement.  The successful work of the new executive will only be realized in the creation of a culture in which leadership is distributed and encouraged with teachers, which consists of open, honest communication, which is focused on the use of data, teamwork, research-based best practices, and which uses modern tools to drive ethical and principled, goal-oriented action. This culture of disciplined thought and action is rooted in the ability of the relationships among all stakeholders to build a trusting, transparent environment that reduces all stakeholders’ sense of vulnerability as they address the challenges of transformational change.

Philosophical Foundation for the School Executive Standards

The following points underlie this work:

·       Today schools must have proactive school executives who possess a great sense of urgency.

·       The goal of school leadership is to transform schools so that large-scale, sustainable, continuous improvement becomes built in to their mode of operation.

·       The moral purpose of school leadership is to create schools in which all students learn, the gap between high and low performance is greatly diminished and what students learn will prepare them for success in their futures, not ours.

·       Leadership is not a position or a person.  It is a practice that must be embedded in all job roles at all levels of the school district.

·       The work of leadership is about working with, for and through people.  It is a social act.  Whether we are discussing instructional leadership, change leadership or leadership as learning, people are always the medium for the leader.  

·       Leadership is not about doing everything oneself but it is always about creating processes and systems that will cause everything to happen. 

·       Leadership is about the executive’s ability to select and develop a strong executive staff whose complementary strengths promote excellence in all seven functions of leadership identified in this document.

·       The concept of leadership is extremely complex and systemic in nature.  Isolating the parts of leadership completely misses the power of the whole.  It is not just knowing what to do, but why to do it, how to do it and when to do it.

·       Within a school district there are nested leadership systems (local boards of education, central office, school, and classroom).  For the organization to be successful these systems must be aligned and supportive, and function as a team.

·       Leadership is about setting direction, aligning and motivating people to implement positive sustained improvement.

·       Leaders bring their “person” to the practice of leadership.  Matching the context of leadership to the “person” of the individual is important to the success of the leader.

Intended Purposes of the Standards

The North Carolina School Executive Standards have been developed as a guide for principals and assistant principals as they continually reflect upon and improve their effectiveness as leaders throughout all of the stages of their careers.  Although there are many influences on a school executive’s development, these standards will serve as an important tool for principals and assistant principals as they consider their growth and development as executives leading schools in the 21st century.  Taken as a whole these standards, practices and competencies are overwhelming.  One might ask, “How can one person possess all of these?”  The answer is they can not. It is, therefore, imperative that a school executive understands the importance of building an executive team that has complementary skills.  The more diversity that exists on the team the more likely the team will be to demonstrate high performance in all critical function areas.  The main responsibility of the school executive is to create aligned systems of leadership throughout the school and its community.

In addition, these standards will serve other audiences and purposes.  These standards will:

·       Inform higher education programs in developing the content and requirements of school executive degree programs;

·       Focus the goals and objectives of districts as they support, monitor and evaluate their school executives;

·       Guide professional development for school executives;

·       Serve as a tool in developing coaching and mentoring programs for school executives.

Organization of the Standards

Each standard is formatted as follows: 

·       Standard:  The standard is the broad category of the executive’s knowledge and skills;

·       Summary:  The summary more fully describes the content and rationale of each Standard;

·       Practices:  The practices are statements of what one would see an effective executive doing in each Standard;

·       Artifacts:  The artifacts are evidence of the quality of the executive’s work or places where evidence can be found in each Standard.  Collectively they could be the components of a performance portfolio.  The lists of artifacts are not meant to be exhaustive.

·       Competencies:   Although not articulated there are many obvious competencies inherent in the practices of each critical leadership function.  This document concludes with a list of those competencies which may not be obvious but that support practice in multiple leadership functions. 

The Seven Standards of Executive Leadership and Their Connection

The seven critical standards used as the framework for the North Carolina School Executive Standards are borrowed from a Wallace Foundation study, Making Sense of Leading Schools: A Study of the School Principalship (2003). Unlike many current efforts that look at all of the things principals “might” or “should” do, this study examined what principals actually do. As such, it is grounded in practice, exploits story and narrative, and supports the distribution of leadership rather than the “hero leader.”

North Carolina’s Standards for School Executives are interrelated and connect in executives’ practice.  They are not intended to isolate competencies or practices.  Executives’ abilities in each standard will impact their ability to perform effectively in other standard areas.  For example, the ability of an executive to evaluate and develop staff will directly impact the school’s ability to reach its goals and will also impact the norms of the culture of the school.

School executives are responsible for ensuring that leadership happens in all seven critical areas, but they don’t have to provide it.

The seven standards and their practices are:

STANDARD 1:  STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

Summary:  School executives will create conditions that result in strategically re-imaging the school’s vision, mission, and goals in the 21st century. Understanding that schools ideally prepare students for an unseen but not altogether unpredictable future, the leader creates a climate of inquiry that challenges the school community to continually re-purpose itself by building on its core values and beliefs about its preferred future and then developing a pathway to reach it. 

The school executive practices effective strategic leadership when he or she

·       Is able to share a vision of the changing world in the 21st century that schools are preparing children to enter;

·       Systematically challenges the status quo by leading change with potentially beneficial outcomes;

·       Systematically considers new ways of accomplishing tasks and is comfortable with major changes in how processes are implemented;

·       Utilizes data from the NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey in developing the framework for continual improvement in the School Improvement Plan;

·       Is a driving force behind major initiatives that help students acquire 21st century skills;

·       Creates with all stakeholders a vision for the school that captures peoples’ attention and imagination;

·       Creates processes that provide for the periodic review and revision of the school’s vision, mission, and strategic goals by all school stakeholders;

·       Creates processes to ensure the school’s identity (vision, mission, values, beliefs and goals) actually drive decisions and inform the culture of the school;

·       Adheres to statutory requirements regarding the School Improvement Plan;

·       Facilitates the collaborative development of annual school improvement plans to realize strategic goals and objectives;

·       Facilitates the successful execution of the school improvement plan aligned to the mission and goals set by the State Board of Education;

·       Facilitates the implementation of state education policy inside the school’s classrooms;

·       Facilitates the setting of high, concrete goals and the expectations that all students meet them;

·       Communicates strong professional beliefs about schools, teaching, and learning that reflect latest research and best practice in preparing students for success in college or in work;

·       Creates processes to distribute leadership throughout the school.

Artifacts:

·       Degree to which school improvement plan strategies are implemented, assessed and modified

·       Evidence of an effectively functioning, elected School Improvement Team

·       NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey

·       School improvement plan, its alignment with district and state strategic priorities, and a plan for growth on items of concern as evidenced in the NC TWC Survey

·       The degree to which staff can articulate the school’s direction and focus

·       Student testing data

STANDARD 2:  INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP

Summary:  School executives will set high standards for the professional practice of 21st century instruction and assessment that result in a no nonsense accountable environment.  The school executive must be knowledgeable of best instructional and school practices and must use this knowledge to cause the creation of collaborative structures within the school for the design of highly engaging schoolwork for students, the on-going peer review of this work and the sharing of this work throughout the professional community.  

The school executive practices effective instructional leadership when he or she

·       Focuses his or her own and others’ attention persistently and publicly on learning and teaching by initiating and guiding conversations about instruction and student learning that are oriented towards high expectations and concrete goals;

·       Creates an environment of practiced distributive leadership and teacher empowerment;

·       Demonstrates knowledge of 21st century curriculum, instruction, and assessment by leading or participating in meetings with teachers and parents where these topics are discussed, and/or holding frequent formal or informal conversations with students, staff and parents around these topics;

·       Ensures that there is an appropriate and logical alignment between the curriculum of the school and the state’s accountability program;

·       Creates processes and schedules that facilitate the collaborative (team) design, sharing, evaluation, and archiving of rigorous, relevant, and engaging  instructional lessons that ensure students acquire essential knowledge;

·       Challenges staff to reflect deeply on and define what knowledge, skills and concepts are essential to the complete educational development of students;

·       Creates processes for collecting and using student test data and other formative data from other sources for the improvement of instruction;

·       Creates processes for identifying, benchmarking and providing students access to a variety of 21st century instructional tools (e.g., technology) and best practices for meeting diverse student needs;

·       Creates processes that ensure the strategic allocation and use of resources to meet instructional goals and support teacher needs;

·       Creates processes to provide formal feedback to teachers concerning the effectiveness of their classroom instruction;

·       Creates processes that protect teachers from issues and influences that would detract from their instructional time;

·       Systematically and frequently observes in classrooms and engages in conversation with students about their learning.

Artifacts:

·       School improvement plan

·       NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey

·       Student achievement data

·       Dropout data

·       Teacher retention data

·       Documented use of formative assessment instruments to impact instruction

·       Development and communication of goal-oriented personalized education plans for identified students (ESOL, exceptional children, Level I and Level II children)

·       Evidence of the team development and evaluation of classroom lessons

STANDARD 3:  CULTURAL LEADERSHIP 

Summary:  School executives will understand and act on the understanding of the important role a school’s culture contributes to the exemplary performance of the school.  School executives must support and value the traditions, artifacts, symbols and positive values and norms of the school and community that result in a sense of identity and pride upon which to build a positive future.  A school executive must be able to “reculture” the school if needed to align with school’s goals of improving student and adult learning and to infuse the work of the adults and students with passion, meaning and purpose.  Cultural leadership implies understanding the school as the people in it each day, how they came to their current state, and how to connect with their traditions in order to move them forward to support the school’s efforts to achieve individual and collective goals.

The school executive practices effective cultural leadership when he or she

·       Creates a collaborative work environment predicated on site-based management that supports the “team” as the basic unit of learning and decision-making within the school and promotes cohesion and cooperation among staff;

·       Communicates strong ideals and beliefs about schooling, teaching, and professional learning communities with teachers, staff, parents, and students and then operates from those beliefs;

·       Influences the evolution of the culture to support the continuous improvement of the school as outlined in the school improvement plan;

·       Systematically develops and uses shared values, beliefs and a shared vision to establish a school identity that emphasizes a sense of community and cooperation to guide the disciplined thought and action of all staff and students;

·       Systematically and fairly acknowledges failures and celebrates accomplishments of the school and staff;

·       Visibly supports the positive, culturally-responsive traditions of the school community;

·       Promotes a sense of well-being among staff, students and parents;

·       Builds a sense of efficacy and empowerment among staff that result in a “can do” attitude when faced with challenges;

·       Empowers staff to recommend creative 21st century concepts for school improvement 

Artifacts:

·       Work of Professional Learning Communities within and tangential to the school

·       Documented use of the SIT in decision-making throughout the year

·       NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey

·       School improvement plan

·       Teacher retention data

·       Student achievement data

·       Awards structure developed by school 

STANDARD 4:  HUMAN RESOURCE LEADERSHIP

 Summary:  School executives will ensure that the school is a professional learning community.  School executives will ensure that processes and systems are in place that results in the recruitment, induction, support, evaluation, development and retention of a high performing staff.  The school executive must engage and empower accomplished teachers in a distributive leadership manner, including support of teachers in day-to-day decisions such as discipline, communication with parents, and protecting teachers from duties that interfere with teaching, and must practice fair and consistent evaluation of teachers.  The school executive must engage teachers and other professional staff in conversations to plan their career paths and support district succession planning.

 The school executive practices effective human resource leadership when he or she

·       Provides structures for the development of effective professional learning communities aligned with the school improvement plan, focused on results, and characterized by collective responsibility for instructional planning and for 21st century student learning;

·       Models the importance of continued adult learning by engaging in activities to develop personal knowledge and skill along with expanded self – awareness;

·       Communicates a positive attitude about the ability of staff to accomplish substantial outcomes to improve their efficacy;

·       Creates processes for teachers to assume leadership and decision making roles within the school that foster their career development;

·       Creates and monitors processes for hiring, inducting and mentoring new teachers and other staff to the school;

·       Uses the results of the Teacher Working Conditions Survey to create and maintain a positive work environment for teachers and other staff;

·       Evaluates teachers and other staff in a fair and equitable manner and utilizes the results of evaluations to improve performance;

·       Provides for results-oriented professional development that is aligned with identified 21st century curricular, instructional, and assessment needs, is connected to school improvement goals and is differentiated based on staff needs;

·       Continuously searches for the best placement and utilization of staff to fully benefit from their strengths;

·       Is systematically and personally involved in the school’s professional activities.

Artifacts:

·       School improvement plan

·       NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey – with special emphasis on the leadership and empowerment domains

·       Copy of master school schedule documenting the time provided for individual and collaborative planning for every teacher

·       Number of National Board Certified teachers

·       Teacher retention data

·       Number of teachers pursuing school executive credentials, National Board Certification, or advanced licensure in their teaching areas

·       Records of school visits for the purpose of adult learning

·       Record of professional development provided staff and an assessment of the impact of professional development on student learning

·       Mentor records, beginning teacher feedback, and documentation of correlation of assignment of mentor to mentee

·       Copies of professional growth plans

·       Student achievement data 

STANDARD 5:  MANAGERIAL LEADERSHIP 

Summary:  School executives will ensure that the school has processes and systems in place for budgeting, staffing, problem solving, communicating expectations and scheduling that result in organizing the work routines in the building.  The school executive must be responsible for the monitoring of the school budget and the inclusion of all teachers in the budget decisions so as to meet the 21st century needs of every classroom.  Effectively and efficiently managing the complexity of every day life is critical for staff to be able to focus its energy on improvement.

The school executive practices effective managerial leadership when he or she

·       Creates processes to provide for a balanced operational budget for school programs and activities;

·       Creates processes to recruit and retain a high-quality workforce in the school that meets the diverse needs of students;

·       Creates processes to identify and solve, resolve, dissolve or absolve school-based problems/conflicts in a fair, democratic way;

·       Designs a system of communication that provides for the timely, responsible sharing of information to, from, and with school and district staff;

·       Designs scheduling processes and protocols that maximize staff input and addresses diverse student learning needs;

·       Develops a master schedule for the school to maximize student learning by providing for individual and on-going collaborative planning for every teacher;

·       Collaboratively develops and enforces clear expectations, structures, rules and procedures for students and staff.

Artifacts:

·       NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey

·       School Improvement Plan

·       External reviews, such as budget

·       Copies of master schedules/procedures

·       Communication of safety procedures and behavioral expectations throughout the school community

STANDARD 6:  EXTERNAL DEVELOPMENT LEADERSHIP

Summary:  A school executive will design structures and processes that result in community engagement, support, and ownership. Acknowledging that schools no longer reflect but in fact build community, the leader proactively creates with staff opportunities for parents, community and business representatives to participate as “stockholders” in the school such that continued investments of resources and good will are not left to chance.

The school executive practices effective external development leadership when he or she

·       Implements processes that empower parents and other stakeholders to make significant decisions;

·       Creates systems that engage all community stakeholders in a shared responsibility for student and school success;

·       Designs protocols and processes that ensures compliance with state and district mandates;

·       Creates opportunities to advocate for the school in the community and with parents;

·       Communicates the school’s accomplishments to the district office and public media in accordance with LEA policies;

·       Garners fiscal, intellectual and human resources from the community that support the 21st century learning agenda of the school;

·       Builds relationships with individuals and groups to support specific aspects of the learning improvement agenda and also as a source of general good will.

Artifacts:

·       PTSA participation

·       PTSA meeting agendas, bulletins, etc.

·       Parent attendance at school improvement team meetings

·       Survey results from parents

·       Evidence of visible support from community

·       Booster club participation

·       Number of school volunteers

·       Plan for shaping the school’s image throughout the community

·       PTSA membership

·       Evidence of business partnerships and projects involving business partners

STANDARD 7:  MICROPOLITICAL LEADERSHIP

Summary:  The school executive will build systems and relationships that utilize the staff’s diversity, encourage constructive ideological conflict in order to leverage staff expertise, power and influence to realize the school’s vision for success.  The executive will also creatively employ an awareness of staff’s professional needs, issues, and interests to build social cohesion and to facilitate distributed governance and shared decision-making.

The school executive practices effective micropolitical leadership when he or she:

·       Uses the School Improvement Team to make decisions and provides opportunities for staff to be involved in developing school policies;

·       Creates an environment and mechanisms to ensure all internal stakeholder voices are heard and respected;

·       Creates processes and protocols to buffer and mediate staff interests;

·       Is easily accessible to teachers and staff;

·       Designs transparent systems to equitably manage human and financial resources;

·       Demonstrates sensitivity to personal needs of  staff;

·       Demonstrates awareness of informal groups and relationships among school staff and utilizes these as a positive resource;

·       Demonstrates awareness of hidden and potentially discordant issues in the school;

·       Encourages people to express opinions contrary to those of authority;

·       Demonstrates ability to predict what could go wrong from day to day;

·       Uses performance as the primary criterion for reward and advancement;

·       Maintains high visibility throughout the school;

·       Maintains open, vertical and horizontal communications throughout the school community. 

Artifacts:

·       NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey

·       Teacher retention data

·       Dissemination of clear norms and ground rules

·       Evidence of ability to confront ideological conflict and then reach consensus

·       Evidence of shared decision-making

·       Evidence of use of a decision matrix

·       Evidence of a school that operates through teams

·       Evidence of distributed leadership

 STANDARD 8: ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT LEADERSHIP

Summary: School executives will contribute to the academic success of students.  The work of the school executive will result in acceptable, measurable progress for students based on established performance expectations using appropriate data to demonstrate growth.

An executive’s rating on the eighth standard is determined by a school-wide student growth value as calculated by the statewide growth model for educator effectiveness.  For the purposes of determining the eighth standard rating, the school-wide growth value includes data from the measures of student learning - End-of-Course assessments, End-of-Grade assessments, Career and Technical Education Post-Assessments, NC Final Exams, K-3 Checkpoints, and Analysis of Student Work.  Districts may also use other assessments to measure student learning and include them in the eighth standard rating if the State Board of Education approves those assessments.  The End-of-Grade assessments and End-of-Course assessments must be used for courses and grades/subjects in which they are administered.

The student growth value places an executive into one of three rating categories:

Does not meet expected growth: the school-wide student growth value for is lower than what was expected per the statewide growth model.

Meets expected growth: the school-wide student growth value is what was expected per the statewide growth model.

Exceeds expected growth: the school-wide student growth value exceeds what was expected per the statewide growth model.

All local school boards shall use student growth values generated through a method approved by the State Board of Education.

EFFECTIVENESS OF SCHOOL EXECUTIVES

 

Per federal requirements, the State must adopt definitions of effective and highly effective school executives.  These definitions constitute the official status of a school executive.

A highly effective administrator is one who receives a rating of at least “accomplished” on each of the Principal Evaluation Standards 1 – 7 and receives a rating of “exceeds expected growth” on Standard 8 of the Principal Evaluation Instrument.

An effective administrator is one who receives a rating of at least “proficient” on each of the Principal Evaluation Standards 1 – 7 and receives a rating of at least “meets expected growth” on Standard 8 of the Principal Evaluation Instrument.

An administrator in need of improvement is one who fails to receive a rating of at least “proficient” on each of the Principal Evaluation Standards 1 – 7 or receives a rating of “does not meet expected growth” on Standard 8 of the Principal Evaluation.

For school systems using the state effectiveness model, only student growth values based on the students taught in a school executive’s specific school will be used to determine the three-year rolling average for that administrator.  A three-year rolling average of student growth values generates the eighth standard rating used to determine school executive effectiveness, with the exception of the first statuses awarded to administrators in the fall of 2015.

Administrators with school-specific student growth values for the 2012-13, 2013-14, and 2014-15 school years will receive a status in the fall of 2015 based on their summative ratings on Standards 1 – 7 in 2014-15 and a Standard 8 rating based on the average of the highest two of three student growth values from those years. 

After the first statuses awarded in the fall of 2015, a three-year rolling average will be used to assign the Standard 8 rating used to determine a status.

If a district has elected to determine Standard 8 with a local option plan approved by the State Board of Education, the district will determine the measures and the data required for an effectiveness status.  At a minimum, the school administrator’s evaluation must include data generated from student growth values determined through End-of-Grade assessments and End-of-Course assessments administered in his/her school.

Any State Board of Education-mandated steps for improvement based on an administrator’s status of “in need of improvement” are delayed until a status is assigned in the fall of 2016.


 

Standards for Superintendent and Instructional Central Office Staff Member Evaluation

NORTH CAROLINA PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS FOR SUPERINTENDENTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL CENTRAL OFFICE STAFF MEMBERS

Public education’s changed mission dictates the need for a new type of school leader – an executive instead of an administrator. Like their executive colleagues in business, government, or health and human services, superintendents must create school districts as organizations that can learn and change quickly if they are to improve performance. School systems need chief executive officers, supported by local boards of education, who are adept at creating systems for change and at building powerful relationships with and across all staff that tap into the collective knowledge and insight they possess and stir their passions for their work for children. Out of these relationships the superintendent must create a common shared understanding of the purpose of the work of the schools and school district and commitment to and ownership of a set of beliefs and goals that focus everyone’s decision making. The staff’s common understanding of the district’s identity empowers them to seek and build powerful alliances and partnerships with students, parents, and community stakeholders in order to enhance their ability to produce improved student achievement. The successful work of the new executive will only be realized in the creation of a culture in which leadership is distributed and encouraged with teachers and others; communication is honest and open; there is focus on the use of data, teamwork, and research-based best practices; and modern tools are used to drive ethical, principled, and goal-oriented action. This culture of disciplined thought is rooted in the ability of the superintendent to build a trusting, transparent environment for all stakeholders.

Philosophical Foundations of the Standards

The standards are predicated on the following beliefs:

·       Today’s schools must have proactive leaders who possess a great sense of urgency to ensure that every student graduates from high school prepared for life in the 21st Century.

·       The primary goal of school district leadership is to transform schools so that large-scale, sustainable continuous improvement is built into their most basic modes of thinking and doing.

·       The moral purpose of school district leadership is to create schools in which all students learn, where the gaps between high and low performance are greatly diminished, and where what students learn prepares them for success in their futures.

·       Leadership is neither a position nor a person. It is a collection of practices that must be embedded in all job roles at all levels of schools and the school district.

·       The work of school district leadership is with, for, and through people. Leadership is a social act, in which people are the medium of change.

·       School district leadership does not require doing all tasks by oneself, but it does require creating systems and processes where all tasks can be accomplished at high levels of proficiency.

·       School district leadership depends on the superintendent’s ability to select and develop a senior-level executive staff whose complementary strengths promote excellence in all seven standards for executive leadership described in this document.

·       Leadership is extremely complex and systemic in nature. Isolating parts misses the power of holistic thinking. Leadership requires not only knowing what to do, but knowing why to do it, how to do it, and when to do it as well.

·       Within a school district, there are nested leadership systems (e.g., local boards of education, central office, schools, classrooms,etc.). To be successful, the superintendent must ensure these systems are aligned and are mutually supportive of one another.

·       Superintendents bring themselves to the practices of executive leadership. Matching the context of school district leadership with the leadership character of the superintendent is important to the mutual success of both.

 

Intended Purposes of the Standards

The North Carolina Standards for Superintendents have been developed as a guide for superintendents and other senior-level school district executives as they continually reflect on and improve their effectiveness in whatever executive roles they assume in their professional careers. Although there are many influences on a superintendent’s development, these standards can serve as a tool to aid in the improvement of school district leadership for 21st Century schools. Taken as a whole, these standards, practices, and competencies can be overwhelming. One might ask, “How can one person possess all of these?” The answer is: One person cannot. Therefore, it is critical that the superintendent build an executive team that has complementary knowledge, skills, and experiences. The more authentic diversity on the team, the more probable the team can deal with the complexities of leading educational systems in the challenges of the 21st century.

In addition, these standards will serve other audiences and purposes. These standards will:

·       Inform higher education programs in developing the content and requirements of degree programs leading to licensure as a school superintendent;

·       Focus the goals and objectives of local boards of education as they support, monitor, and evaluate the performances of their senior executives;

·       Guide the professional development and continuing professional improvement for superintendents and other senior-level executives;

·       Serve as a tool in developing executive coaching and mentoring programs for senior-level executives.

 

Organization of the Standards

Each standard is formatted as follows:

·       Standard: The standard is the broad category of the executive’s knowledge and skills.

·       Summary: The summary more fully describes the content and rationale of each Standard.

·       Practices: The practices are statements of what one would see an effective executive doing in each Standard. The lists of practices are not meant to be exhaustive.

·       Artifacts: The artifacts are examples of evidence of the quality of the executive’s work or places where evidence can be found in each Standard. Collectively they could be the components of a performance portfolio. The lists of artifacts are not meant to be exhaustive.

·       Competencies: Although not articulated, there are many obvious competencies inherent in the practices of each critical leadership function. This document concludes with a list of those competencies which may not be obvious but that support practice in multiple leadership functions.

 

The Seven Standards of Executive Leadership and Their Connection

The seven critical standards used as a framework for the North Carolina Superintendent Standards are aligned with the seven standards for school executives adopted by the NC State Board of Education in 2006. The school executive standards are adapted from a Wallace Foundation study, Making Sense of Leading Schools: A Study of the School Principalship (2004). Additionally, the seven standards for superintendents reflect the 2006 work of McREL (Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning), School District Leadership that Works: The Effect of Superintendent Leadership on Student Achievement. North Carolina’s Standards for Superintendents are interrelated and connect in the practices of superintendents and other senior-level executives.

They are not intended to isolate competencies or practices. Superintendents’ abilities in meeting the demands in any given standard impact their abilities to perform effectively in other challenges articulated in other standards. For example, a superintendent’s effectiveness in developing and evaluating staff directly impacts the organization’s ability to reach its goals and also impacts the development of cultural norms in the district. While superintendents may not actually have to do all of the work contained in all seven standards, they are responsible for ensuring that all areas have effective leadership.

Professional Learning Communities

As used throughout this document, the term professional learning communities (PLCs) describes a collegial group of administrators and school staff who are united in their commitment to student learning and who work in an environment characterized by mutual cooperation, personal growth, and a synergy of efforts. In PLCs, school and district administrators share power and authority by inviting staff input in decision making and by a sustained commitment to learning among staff about solutions to address students' needs.

STANDARD 1: STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

Summary: Superintendents create conditions that result in strategically re-imaging the district’s vision, mission, and goals to ensure that every student graduates from high school, globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and prepared for life in the 21st Century. They create a climate of inquiry that challenges the community to continually repurpose itself by building on the district’s core values and beliefs about the preferred future and then developing a pathway to reach it.

Practices: The superintendent practices effective strategic leadership when he or she:

·       Creates a working relationship with the local board of education that results in a shared vision for the district of the changing world in the 21st century that schools are preparing children to enter;

·       Systematically challenges the status quo by leading change with potentially beneficial outcomes;

·       Systematically considers new ways of accomplishing tasks and is comfortable with major changes in how processes are implemented;

·       Models and reinforces the culture and vision of the district by having open discussion sessions with teachers, school executives, staff, board members, and other stakeholders regarding the strategic direction of the district and encouraging their feedback on how to better attain the district’s vision, mission, and goals;

·       Is a driving force behind major initiatives that help students acquire 21st Century skills;

·       Creates processes that provide for the development, periodic review, and revision of the

district’s vision, mission, and strategic goals by all stakeholders;

·       Creates processes to ensure the district’s identity (vision, mission, values, beliefs and goals) actually drives decisions and reflects the culture of the district;

·       Facilitates the collaborative development of annual school improvement plans to realize strategic goals and objectives, adhering to statutory requirements;

·       Facilitates the development and implementation of a district strategic plan, aligned to the mission and goals set by the State Board of Education and local priorities, using multiple sources of data (e.g. student performance data, data from the NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey), in concert with the local board of education;

·       Determines financial priorities, in concert with the local board of education, based on the strategic plan;

·       Facilitates the implementation of state education policy;

·       Facilitates the setting of high, concrete goals and the expectations that all students meet them;

·       Monitors progress in meeting district goals;

·       Communicates strong professional beliefs about schools, learning, and teaching that reflect latest research and best practice in preparing students for success in college or in work;

·       Creates processes to distribute leadership throughout the district.

 

Artifacts:

    District strategic plan

    School Improvement Plans are implemented, assessed and modified

    Effectively functioning, elected School Improvement Teams

    Superintendent’s performance plan aligned with state and local strategic priorities and objectives

    Staff can articulate the district’s direction and focus

    Student performance data

 

Standard 2: INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP

Summary: Superintendents set high standards for the professional practice of 21st century instruction and assessment that result in an accountable environment. They create professional learning communities resulting in highly engaging instruction and improved student learning. They set specific achievement targets for schools and students and then ensure the consistent use of research-based instructional strategies in all classrooms to reach the targets.

Practices: The superintendent practices effective instructional leadership when he or she:

·       Leads with a clear, high-profile focus on learning and teaching oriented towards high expectations and concrete goals;

·       Challenges staff to reflect deeply on and define the knowledge, skills, and concepts essential for ensuring that every public school student graduates from high school, globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and prepared for life in the 21st Century;

·       Establishes effectively functioning professional learning communities;

·       Ensures collaborative goal setting resulting in nonnegotiable goals (i.e., goals that all staff members must act upon) for student achievement and classroom instruction;

·       Ensures that there is an appropriate and logical alignment between the district’s curriculum, 21st Century instruction and assessment, and the state accountability program;

·       Establishes clear priorities among the district’s instructional goals and objectives;

·       Creates processes for using student test data and formative data from other sources for the improvement of instruction;

·       Utilizes an instructional evaluation program that accurately monitors implementation of the district’s instructional program;

·       Creates processes for identifying, implementing, and monitoring use of 21st Century instructional tools and best practices for meeting diverse student needs;

·       Creates processes that ensure the strategic allocation and use of resources to meet instructional goals and support teacher needs;

·       Creates processes to provide formal feedback to school executives concerning the effectiveness of their instructional leadership;

·       Monitors student achievement through feedback from the instructional evaluation program;

·       Ensures that instructional time is valued and protected;

·       Provides professional development for school executives in the area of instructional leadership.

 

Artifacts:

·       District strategic plans

·       School Improvement Plans

·       Professional development plans based on data (e.g., student performance, results of the NC Teacher Working Conditions Survey)

·       Student performance goals

·       Student performance data

·       Use of formative assessment to impact instruction

·       District instructional evaluation program

 

STANDARD 3: CULTURAL LEADERSHIP

Summary: Superintendents understand and act on the important role a system’s culture has in the exemplary performance of all schools. They understand the people in the district and community, how they came to their current state, and how to connect with their traditions in order to move them forward to support the district’s efforts to achieve individual and collective goals. While supporting and valuing the history, traditions, and norms of the district and community, a superintendent must be able to “reculture” the district, if needed, to align with the district’s goals of improving student and adult learning and to infuse the work of the adults and students with passion, meaning and purpose.

Practices: The superintendent practices effective cultural leadership when he or she:

·       Communicates strong ideals and beliefs about schooling, teaching, and professional learning communities with all stakeholders and then operates from those beliefs;